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ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT (ESIA)

OF THE

TONGUMA EXPLORATION PROJECT, KENEMA DISTRICT



ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL MANAGEMENT PLANS

(ESMP)



Prepared by

CEMMATS Group Ltd

On Behalf of



TONGUMA LTD



Freetown, Sierra Leone



September

2014



Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



DOCUMENT HISTORY

Version History



Date



Reviewer



Title



Environmental and Social Impact Assessment for the Tonguma Exploration

Project: Environmental and Social Management Plans



Authors



Vanessa James; Nyake Mattia; Maada Kangbai



Date



September 2014



Subject



Environmental and Social Management Plans



Publisher



CEMMATS Group Ltd



Type



Client Report



Description



ESIA for the Tonguma Kimberlite Exploration Project



Contributors

Format



Microsoft™ Word 2007



Source



Text



Rights



© CEMMATS Group Ltd



Identifier

Language



English



Relation

Coverage



Sierra Leone, 2014



© CEMMATS Group Ltd, September

2014



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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



CONSULTANT’S DISCLAIMER



CEMMATS Group Ltd (hereafter, 'CEMMATS') has prepared this Environmental and Social

Impact Assessment (ESIA) Report for the sole use of the Client, TONGUMA Ltd, and for the

intended purposes as stated in the Contract between the Client and CEMMATS under which

this work was completed. This ESIA Report may not be relied upon by any other party

without the express written agreement of CEMMATS and/or the Client.

CEMMATS has exercised due and customary care in conducting this ESIA but has not, save

as specifically stated, independently verified information provided by others. No other

warranty, expressed or implied is made in relation to the conduct of the ESIAS or the

contents of this Report. Therefore, CEMMATS assumes no liability for any loss resulting

from errors, omissions or misrepresentations made by others. This Report has been prepared

at the request of the Client. The use of this Report by unauthorised third parties without

written authorisation from CEMMATS shall be at their own risk, and CEMMATS accepts no

duty of care to any such third party.

Any recommendations, opinions or findings stated in this Report are based on circumstances

and facts as they existed at the time CEMMATS performed the work. Any changes in such

circumstances and facts upon which this Report is based may adversely affect any

recommendations, opinions or findings contained in this Report.

No part of this Report may be copied or duplicated without the express written permission of

the Client and/or CEMMATS. Where field investigations have been carried out, these have

been restricted to a level of detail required to achieve the stated objectives of the work

referred to in the Contract. This work has been undertaken in accordance with CEMMATS'

Quality System.

Signed by:



Andrew Keili

CEMMATS Group Ltd

Beyoh House

7A Cantonment Road

Off King Harman Road

Brookfields

Freetown

Sierra Leone

Email: akeili@cemmatssl.com

Tel: +232 76602174

Website: www.cemmatssl.com



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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

We wish to extend our appreciation to various government of Sierra Leone (GOSL)

ministries, departments, agencies, institutions, statutory bodies, organisations and individuals

whose assistance, either directly or indirectly, made the Environmental and Social Impact

Assessment (ESIA) of the Tonguma Kimberlite Exploration Project possible. We are

particularly grateful to the assistance availed to us by the Environment Protection Agency

Sierra Leone (EPA-SL) and its staff, especially for providing us with useful take off guidance

to carry out the esia study.

We acknowledge the assistance and cooperation of Gert van der Westhuizen, Peter Carsten,

Kevin Ashiera and staff of Tonguma Ltd, who availed us relevant documents and

information, to successfully carry out this study.

We are thankful to the local authorities and members of the various communities visited

within and around the Tonguma Exploration concession area, for their diverse assistance

during the main field visit.

Last but not least, we would like to thank all those who, in one way or another contributed to

making this ESIA study successful.



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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



TABLE OF CONTENTS

DOCUMENT HISTORY ........................................................................................................ I

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT .................................................................................................... III

TABLE OF CONTENTS ..................................................................................................... IV

LIST OF TABLES ............................................................................................................... VII

ACRONYMS ...................................................................................................................... VIII

ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL MANAGEMENT PLAN .......................................... 1

SECTION A .............................................................................................................................. 1

1



ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY PLAN (EHSP)................................. 2

1.1

1.1.1



1.2

1.2.1

1.2.2

1.2.3

1.2.4

1.2.5

1.2.6

1.2.7

1.2.8



Introduction .............................................................................................................. 2

Safety................................................................................................................................. 2



Effective Organisation and Management Responsibilities .................................. 4

Mining Manager ................................................................................................................ 5

Health, Safety, Security and Environment Officer............................................................ 5

Departmental Supervisors ................................................................................................. 6

Medical Assistance............................................................................................................ 6

Training and Communications .......................................................................................... 6

Hazard Recognition ........................................................................................................... 6

Emergency Response Training.......................................................................................... 7

Employee and Contractor Responsibility .......................................................................... 8



SECTION B .............................................................................................................................. 9

2



WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN (WMP) .................................................................. 10

2.1

2.2

2.3

2.3.1

2.3.2

2.3.3



2.4

2.4.1

2.4.2

2.4.3

2.4.4

2.4.5



Introduction ............................................................................................................ 10

Objectives of the Waste Management Plan ......................................................... 10

Waste Management and Disposal Facilities ........................................................ 11

Waste Identification ........................................................................................................ 11

Hazardous and Domestic Wastes .................................................................................... 11

Mine Wastes .................................................................................................................... 14



Management Responsibilities ............................................................................... 15

The Establishment of Environmental, Health and Safety Department............................ 15

Waste Facility Record Keeping....................................................................................... 15

Management Training Responsibilities ........................................................................... 16

Employee Training Courses ............................................................................................ 16

Requirements of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for waste disposal.................... 16



SECTION C ............................................................................................................................ 18

3



EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN (ERP) ................................................................. 19

3.1

3.2

3.2.1

3.2.2



3.3

3.4

3.4.1



Introduction ............................................................................................................ 19

Emergency Response and Preparedness .............................................................. 20

Incident Management Teams .......................................................................................... 20

Emergency Response Team (ERT) ................................................................................. 21



Emergency Response Plan .................................................................................... 21

Organization and Management Responsibilities ................................................ 22

Emergency Response Team ............................................................................................ 22



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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



3.4.2

3.4.3

3.4.4

3.4.5



3.5

3.5.1

3.5.2

3.5.3

3.5.4

3.5.5



Camp Incident Teams (CIT) ........................................................................................... 23

Emergency Management Teams (EMT) ......................................................................... 23

Crisis Management Teams (CMT) .................................................................................. 23

Manager Responsibilities ................................................................................................ 23



Fire Protection ........................................................................................................ 24

Alarm Detection Systems and Operations ...................................................................... 24

Spills and Leakages ......................................................................................................... 26

Communications ............................................................................................................. 27

Grievances, Disputes and Security .................................................................................. 29

Emergency Response Training........................................................................................ 29



SECTION D ............................................................................................................................ 32

4



RESETTLEMENT POLICY FRAMEWORK (RPF) ................................................ 33

4.1

4.2

4.2.1

4.2.2



4.3

4.3.1



4.4

4.4.1

4.4.2

4.4.3



4.5

4.5.1

4.5.2

4.5.3



4.6

4.7

4.8

4.8.1

4.8.2

4.8.3



4.9

4.10

4.11

4.12

4.13



Introduction ............................................................................................................ 33

Legislation and Regulatory Framework .............................................................. 34

National Legislation ........................................................................................................ 34

World Bank Stipulations ................................................................................................. 35



Implementation Arrangements for Resettlement Policy Framework ............... 35

Implementing Agency ..................................................................................................... 35



Eligibility Criteria .................................................................................................. 37

Affected Parties ............................................................................................................... 37

Eligibility for Compensation ........................................................................................... 37

Eligibility According to National Law ............................................................................ 38



Evaluation of Affected Assets ............................................................................... 38

Types of Compensation Payments .................................................................................. 38

Compensation Calculations for Assets ............................................................................ 39

Rules for Compensation .................................................................................................. 39



Methods of Valuation ............................................................................................ 41

Selection of Potential Resettlement Sites ............................................................. 41

Implementation and Monitoring Procedures ...................................................... 42

Notification of Expropriation Order ................................................................................ 42

Preparation of Individual Compensation Dossiers .......................................................... 42

Preparation, Approval and Signing of Compensation Contract ...................................... 42



Payment of Compensations ................................................................................... 42

Preparation of Resettlement Sites ........................................................................ 43

Resettlement of Affected Households ................................................................... 43

Monitoring .............................................................................................................. 43

Grievance and Redress Mechanisms .................................................................... 44



SECTION E ............................................................................................................................ 46

5



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ACTION PLAN (CDAP) ................................... 47

5.1

5.2

5.3

5.4

5.4.1

5.4.2

5.4.3

5.4.4

5.4.5

5.4.6



Introduction ............................................................................................................ 47

Purpose and Objectives ......................................................................................... 47

Need for Community Development Action Plan (CDAP) .................................. 47

Socio-Economic Survey ......................................................................................... 48

Approach and Methodology ............................................................................................ 48

Findings from Social Assessment Survey ....................................................................... 48

Social Amenities ............................................................................................................. 49

Housing and Household Effects ...................................................................................... 49

Type of Dwelling Unit .................................................................................................... 49

Credit Facility.................................................................................................................. 49



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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



5.5

5.6

5.7

5.7.1



5.8



Some Planned Initiatives by Tonguma Ltd ......................................................... 50

Views from Project Affected Persons (PAPs) ...................................................... 50

Implementation Plan ............................................................................................. 50

Organizational Responsibility and Function ................................................................... 50



Monitoring and Evaluation ................................................................................... 52



SECTION F ............................................................................................................................ 53

6



PUBLIC CONSULTATION AND DISCLOSURE PLAN (PCDP) .......................... 54

6.1

6.2

6.2.1

6.2.2

6.2.3

6.2.4

6.2.5



Objectives of PCDP................................................................................................ 54

Resources and Responsibilities ............................................................................. 54

Stakeholders .................................................................................................................... 55

Consultation and Disclosure Program ............................................................................. 55

Notification for Meetings ................................................................................................ 55

Grievance Mechanisms ................................................................................................... 56

Reporting ......................................................................................................................... 57



SECTION G............................................................................................................................ 59

7



CLOSURE PLAN .......................................................................................................... 60

7.1

7.2

7.2.1



7.3

7.4

7.4.1

7.4.2

7.4.3

7.4.4

7.4.5



7.5

7.6

7.6.1

7.6.2

7.6.3



Decommissioning.................................................................................................... 60

Reclamation and Closure Plan ............................................................................. 60

Approach ......................................................................................................................... 60



Objectives................................................................................................................ 61

Closure and Reclamation Methods ...................................................................... 61

Facility Salvage, Demolition and Disposal ..................................................................... 62

Surface Grading .............................................................................................................. 62

Sediment and Erosion Control ........................................................................................ 62

Soil Stockpiling and Redistribution ................................................................................ 62

Seed and Plant Propagation ............................................................................................. 63



Monitoring .............................................................................................................. 63

Implementation Schedule and Costs .................................................................... 63

Closure and Reclamation Schedule ................................................................................. 63

Financial provision .......................................................................................................... 63

Stakeholder Consultation ................................................................................................ 64



SECTION H ............................................................................................................................ 65

8

MANAGEMENT, MITIGATION, MONITORING AND IMPLEMENTATION

MEASURES ........................................................................................................................... 66

8.1

8.2

8.2.1

8.2.2

8.2.3

8.2.4

8.2.5

8.2.6



8.3



MANAGEMENT PLANS ..................................................................................... 66

MONITORING PLANS ........................................................................................ 75

Climate ............................................................................................................................ 75

Fauna and flora Monitoring Plan .................................................................................... 75

Noise Monitoring Plan .................................................................................................... 75

Groundwater Monitoring Plan ........................................................................................ 75

Air Quality Monitoring Plan ........................................................................................... 76

Surface Water Monitoring Plan....................................................................................... 76



Environmental Management, Monitoring and Training Costs ......................... 76



BIBLIOGRAPHY .................................................................................................................. 78



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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



LIST OF TABLES

Table 4.3-1: Government Support Agents and Responsibilities .............................................. 36

Table 5.7-1: Estimated First 5 Years of 10-Year Budget for the CDAP ................................ 51

Table 8.1-1: Management Plans for the Operational Stage ..................................................... 67

Table 8.1-2: Management Plans for the Decommissioning Stage ........................................... 72

Table 8.3-1: Costs for monitoring and Training ...................................................................... 76



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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



ACRONYMS

0



C



Degrees Celsius



%



Percentage







Inch



CBD Convention on Biodiversity

CBO community-based organisation

CDAP Community Development Action Plan

CDMC Community Development Management Committee

CEMMATS Construction Engineering Maintenance, Manufacturing and Technical Services

CHO Community Health Officer

CI



Corrugated Iron



CITES Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species on wild flora and fauna

cm



centimetre



Cm



2



Square centimetre



CRO Community Relations Officer

dB



decibels



EPA-SL Environment Protection Agency Sierra Leone

ESIA Environmental and Social Impact Assessment

ESMP Environmental and Social Management Plan

ERP



Emergency Response Plan



ft



feet



GDP



Gross Domestic Product



GIS



Geographic Information Systems



GoSL Government of Sierra Leone

GPS



Global Positioning System



HDI



Human Development Index



HSSE Health Safety Security and Environment

IFC



International Finance Corporation



IMR



Infant Mortality Rate



IUCN International Union for Conservation of Nature

JSS



Junior Secondary School



km



kilometre



km



2



Square kilometre



kV



kilovolts



Le



Leones



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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



m



metre



MCH Maternal and Child Health

MDA Ministries, Departments and Agencies

MAFFS Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food Security

MLCPE Ministry of Lands, Country Planning and the Environment

mm



millimetre



MoHS Ministry of Health and Sanitation

m/s



Metre per second



MSDS Material Safety Data Sheet

MWHI The Ministry of works, Housing and Infrastructure

N



North



NE



North-east



NGO Non-Governmental Organization

OHS



Occupational Health and Safety



PAC



Project Affected Communities



PAPs Project Affected Persons

PCDP Public Consultation and Disclosure Plan

PPE



Personal Protective Equipment



PRSP Poverty reduction Strategy Paper

RAP



Resettlement Action Plan



RO



Resettlement Officer



RPF



Resettlement Policy Framework



TOR Terms of Reference

TPL



Traditional pit latrine



Turb. Turbidity

VRV Village Resettlement Committee

WHO World Health Organization

WMP Waste Management Plan

Zn



Zinc



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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

Volume 1 of the Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA) contains the policy,

legal and administrative framework under which the study was carried out and a description

of the project in its geographic, ecological, social and temporal context. Mitigation measures

needed to control, avoid, prevent, reduce and repair impacts to acceptable levels are

presented, as well as an analysis of the cumulative impacts and feasible alternatives.

The Environmental and Social Management Plan (ESMP) outlined in this volume (Volume 2)

presents the environmental management, mitigation, monitoring and institutional measures to

be taken during project implementation and operation, to reduce adverse environmental and

social effects to acceptable levels and enhance positive effects. This plan provides a

framework and requirements/guidance for preparation of a series of sub-plans to be prepared

later. It does not present all of the actual individual plans to be implemented. It specifically

defines what actions must be taken and who is responsible to reduce adverse project impacts.

This ESMP includes several component plans defining specific action programs for waste

management, emergency response, closure and reclamation, community development, and

public consultation, covering the two main phases of this project: the exploration and the

mining. The ESMP highlights the issues and concerns that are presented in the ESIA and

identifies reasonable and practical responses to address and mitigate potentially adverse

effects. It defines the specific actions that will be required to effectively implement those

responses in a timely manner and describes the methods by which management will

demonstrate that those requirements have been met. It also establishes the course that the

project management will follow in complying with Government of Sierra Leone

environmental laws and regulations as well as international policies and guidelines.

This volume is split into the following subsections listed in Table 1.

Table 1: List of Environmental and Social Management Plans for the Project



Sections of

Report



Plans



A.



ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY PLAN (EHSP)



B.



WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN (WMP)



C.



EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN (ERP)



D.



RESETTLEMENT POLICY FRAMEWORK (RPF)



E.



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ACTION PLAN (CDAP)



F.



PUBLIC CONSULTATION AND DISCLOSURE PLAN (PCDP)



G.



CLOSURE PLAN (CP)



H.



MANAGEMENT, MITIGATION, MONITORING AND

IMPLENTATION MEASURES



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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



Environmental Health and Safety Plan (EHSP)

The Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) Plan for the Tonguma Exploration Project

identifies the principles, approach, procedures and methods that will be used to control and

minimize the environmental and social impacts of all construction and operational activities

associated with project development.



Waste Management Plan (WMP)

The Waste Management Plan describes the procedures, systems, equipment, and

structures specific to waste management and disposal. Waste generation will be limited at

all levels of the operation in order to decrease the volume of waste generated and make waste

disposal more manageable. The plan also defines who is responsible for developing and

implementing the plan, and what records and reporting will be required.



Emergency Response Plan (ERP)

The Emergency Response Plan (ERP) provides employees and managers with specific

instructions that will allow them to respond quickly and efficiently to any foreseeable

emergencies likely to occur at the Project. It is developed using recognized and accepted

methods and practices, and includes specific responses, protocols, and management contacts.

The ERP essentially has the goal of protecting people, the environment, property and the

operations. This document deals with typical emergency types that characterize the operation

which include.



Resettlement Policy Framework (RPF)

The Resettlement Policy Framework identifies objectives, principles, policies, procedures,

organisational arrangements and estimated costs (where possible) for dealing with

resettlement and compensation payments related to the implementation of the Project.



Community Development Action Plan (CDAP)

The community development and social assistance programmes aimed at improving the

living conditions of the local communities in a sustainable way are captured under the CDAP.



Public Consultation and Disclosure Plan (PCDP)

The PCDP is intended to define objectives and establish the framework necessary to provide

understandable information to all parties involved. This plan will be implemented to ensure

timely and effective communications between Tonguma Management and the affected

stakeholders. The main objective of the PCDP is to establish a program for multi-directional

communication between the management and stakeholders.



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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



Closure Plan (CP)

The Closure Plan documents plans required to stabilize the site, post exploration and mining

activities. Reclamation activities are implemented to re-establish a beneficial post-operation

land use.



Management, Mitigation, Monitoring and Implementation Measures

Management, mitigation and monitoring measures are presented in this section, which also

includes a comprehensive monitoring plan.



Management of Plans

The Management Plans document the systems and processes that will be implemented over

time at Tonguma Project worksites to ensure compliance with local and international

standards.

Tonguma Ltd will attempt to manage risks in the workplace by applying accepted and

systematic risk management principles combined with routine staff training. Tonguma Ltd

acknowledges recognizes the moral and ethical responsibility they hold to set the standard for

workplace safety in a developing nation.



Occupational Health and Safety Policy

The Tonguma Project and its Management understand that they are ultimately responsible for

Health and Safety in their workplaces, and they actively empower their employees to

implement safe practices in their everyday work.

As part of the process of continuous improvement, the Tonguma Project commits to

involving and consulting all relevant stakeholders to ensure that they have a positive effect on

the organization’s safety culture. The project:





Commits to working toward a ZERO harm policy; and







Sets goals and objectives to determine Health and Safety progress and will endeavour

to comply with or exceed all current legislative standards and requirements.



Environmental and Social Program Philosophy

The company will operate on the following philosophy:

 Respect diversity and cultural differences;

 Educate the workers on health, safety, social, community and environmental

issues;

 Provide safe working conditions for its employees;

 Protect the environment from undue degradation;

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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



 Communicate with the public on its project plans and activities; and





Invest a part of its profit into the communities, to develop skills and opportunities

that can be carried forward without dependence on the economies of the Project.



Corporate Commitment

The Tonguma Ltd’s environmental and social programs aim to continually improve

environmental and safety performance in the workplace, maintain multi-directional

communication among the company, local communities and interested stakeholders.



Policy Implementation

Environmental and social management of the Project is administered through a chain of

command that includes corporate oversight, site management, local employees, contractors

and subcontractors. The key managers will be responsible for:

 Compliance with national regulations and policies;

 Ensuring that the required environmental and social management activities are

implemented and maintained; and

 Reporting on the effectiveness of such activities to executive management and the

Board of Directors for review and corrective action as necessary.

The Tonguma Ltd focuses on developing the capabilities and support mechanisms necessary

to administer environmental and social management. Implementation is based on raising the

level of company-wide awareness of environmental and social requirements, expectations,

and benefits. Health, safety, and environmental protection as well as social issues and

community activities are among the highest project priorities.



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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



SECTION A



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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



1 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY PLAN (EHSP)

1.1 Introduction

The Environmental Health and Safety Plan identifies the principles, approach, procedures and

methods that will be used to control and minimize the adverse environmental and social

impacts of all exploration and mining activities associated with project development. It is

intended to complement the project’s Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA)

and ensure that commitments made by the Tonguma Ltd to minimize project related adverse

environmental and social impacts are upheld throughout all project phases.



1.1.1 Safety

Tonguma Ltd will implement various safety management strategies to minimize risk and to

ensure safe working continuity. These include:

















The process of Hazard and Risk Identification, reporting, assessment and control;

Communication of safety information;

Provide continuous access to safety information;

Tool Box Meetings;

Start Up Meetings;

Safety Alerts and Bulletins; and

Issuing of Work Permits.



Tonguma Ltd believes that the effective management of risk is a critical aspect of its

business. The Project will include general and site specific processes to ensure that risks

associated with the business are identified and managed appropriately.

1.1.1.1 Risk Assessment and Evaluation



All employees and contractors working for Tonguma Ltd are expected to be able to

demonstrate Training and Occupational Health and Safety commitment in the workplace. To

facilitate this, each contracting company is to submit a Health and Safety Management plan

in line with the requirements of their contract. The plan will be approved by the relevant

Safety Manager. For the Tonguma employees, each shall comply with all current Tonguma

Ltd mandatory procedures and this will be reflected in their work evaluation.

Site Specifics

A risk assessment of the company’s operations was carried out and the following issues were

identified for implementation in order to minimise the risks associated with the operation. All work

carried out during this phase will comply with:



 Manual Handling

Supervisors are required to identify manual handling hazards and do what is

reasonably practicable to prevent injuries occurring.



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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



 PPE

As a minimum requirement, all personal protective equipment in use at sites must

comply with the appropriate ISO standard. The minimum PPE required for Tonguma

Limited mine sites shall be:

 High visibility shirts (with reflective stripes or a vest with reflective strips);

 Long trousers or full overalls;

 Steel capped safety and water boots;

 Safety glasses (medium impact);

 Hearing protection;

 Dust masks and ventilators for adverse conditions; and

 Hard hat manufactured in accordance with ISO standards in designated areas.

 Extra Eye Protection

Additional eye and face protection (minimum safety glasses and side shields and full face

visor) conforming to International Standards shall be provided and worn when:

 Welding, cutting, burning, chipping or scrabbling;

 Operating a grinder, drill, metal cutter, masonry saw or drill or similar piece of

equipment;

 Operating an explosive powered tool;

 Striking metal against metal;

 Operating compressed air-activated tools or hose lines; and

 Handling corrosive dust or chemicals.



 Signage

Each site shall ensure signage complies with ISO Standards Guidance in terms of

applicability. All entry points into all confined spaces shall be sign-posted with a danger sign

forbidding entry to unauthorized personnel.



 First Aid Facilities

Tonguma Ltd shall maintain adequate first aid facilities in appropriate locations to aid

for the treatment of injuries.

Paramedics/Registered nurses, physiotherapist who are appointed to operate the First

Aid medical facility, shall keep adequate records of all treatment and medication

supplied.

 Traffic Management

Tonguma Ltd shall make good any damages to public roads used to access the mine site,

provided the damage is attributable to its use of the roadway. No restrictions will be placed on

traffic flowing through the area that uses the access road constructed to the mine site.

However, restrictions will be imposed on traffic flows into active mining areas. Only project

vehicles will be permitted into mining areas and signs will be posted along the access road

indicating to road users that the company will not accept liability for accidents on the access

road and also indicating that road users are responsible for providing their own insurance

cover for accidents on the access road. Signs on speed limits will also be set up within the

concession indicating maximum allowable speeds of 25Km/h.

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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



 Dust Management

There are exposure standards issued by the World Health Organization (WHO). Tonguma

Limited will endeavour to comply with these standards at all times. Each site shall carry out

appropriate personal and positional monitoring for dust to determine their risk profile.



 Hearing Conservation

Each site subject to industrial noise shall complete a Noise Monitoring Survey to determine

their level or risk exposure to noise-induced hearing loss. This should be completed once

operations have commenced.



 Site Inspections and Audits

Each work area supervisor and the local senior site officer (SSO) will be responsible

for ensuring all workplaces are inspected on a regular specified schedule or as

required to maintain a safe work place. Each SSO will be responsible to report to the

Health, Safety, Security and Environment (HSSE) officer when completing a site

safety audit quarterly, who will submit results to the Operational Head.

 Machinery Guarding

No electrical, mechanical and pneumatic machinery are to be operated unless all

guards and/or barricades are in good condition and secured in the correct location and

the equipment is in good working order.

1.1.1.2 Site Operational Procedure



The health and safety of employees and the general public visiting the site are of paramount

importance to Tonguma Ltd. A draft formal Occupational Health and Safety Program has

been developed to support the company’s exploration activities. This program details the

roles of employer and employees as well as contractors working on the site. As required by

international mines standards, a Health, Safety and Security Committee composed of

employee and management representatives is in place.

All employees, contractors and visitors are required to attend safety orientation sessions

conducted by qualified Tonguma Ltd employees. Visitors are always accompanied by an

employee escort to the exploration fields.

All employees are given Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS)

training upon engagement, and Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS).



1.2 Effective Organisation and Management Responsibilities

It is important to delegate Health, Safety, Security and Environment (HSSE) issues to

qualified personnel who will be responsible for ensuring not only adherence, but motivating

the workers to actively engage in their work in a safe manner. Assigning a member of staff or

committee of workers to HSSE issues, marks the first step in managing risks inherent with

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the operation of the project and creates a mechanism by which management can monitor

improvements.

1.2.1 Mining Manager

The Mining Manager is responsible for ensuring that they are continually working towards

improved Health, Safety, Security and Environment standards across the business and that

known risks are controlled as far as is practically possible.

Specific responsibilities include but are not limited to the following:



















Ensuring that there are competent personnel to fulfil senior or management roles;

Overall Management and resourcing of safety cultures and practices within the

business;

Storage and maintenance of important documentation;

Accreditation and licensing requirements are regularly checked;

Internal auditing is completed in a timely manner to appropriate standards;

Assisting staff in carrying out day to day activities on site in a safe manner;

Providing advice and support on all matters relating to field of expertise; and

Ensuring their department / operations complies with legal requirements.



1.2.2 Health, Safety, Security and Environment Officer

The HSSE Officer is the appointed individual responsible for ensuring the ongoing

improvement of health safety in the work place. He will ensure that all reasonable measures

are taken to make provision for equipment and resources to be at the disposal of workers

across the sites. Where resources are inadequate, he will be responsible for ensuring that

senior management is made aware of this.

Specific responsibilities include but are not limited to the following:





Ensure the ongoing improvement of health and safety standards in the work place by

ensuring regular inspections are undertaken and participating in Occupational Health

and Safety (OHS) meetings and training as required;







Review OHS policies and plans as required;







Ensure compliance with legislation, company standards and internal procedures;







Ensure that employees and their representatives are consulted during development and

review of policies and procedures or when changes to work practice may impact on

their OHS







Take action to immediately rectify any unsafe situations or acts and undertake

appropriate disciplinary action against persons who fail to comply with reasonable

expectations;







Prepare a list of emergency contacts;







Maintain the inventory of safety equipment and supplies;



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Arrange for the replacement of used or obsolete safety supplies and equipment;







Organize and train personnel in first aid;







Oversee first response programs;







Inspect and maintain fire extinguishers;







Maintain records on emergencies or fatalities; and







Report to regulatory agencies and stakeholders.



1.2.3 Departmental Supervisors

The Departmental Supervisors engaged in any form of work associated with Tonguma

Limited’s operations shall be responsible for and support Service Providers under their

control. They shall ensure that they are familiar with and adhere to the requirements of this

plan, related procedures and the expectations of their Department Head.



1.2.4 Medical Assistance

Tonguma Ltd has a Paramedic and a clinic. They also have first aid kits to handle all cases of

minor accidents and incidents. Referrals will be made to hospitals for severe cases needing

the attention of a medical doctor. The paramedic assists with upgrading first aid programs

drawn up by the HSSE Officer, training employees in basic first aid procedures and in

responding in the unlikely event of a critical or life-threatening emergency.



1.2.5 Training and Communications

Supervisors will be responsible for determining the overall training and information that is

required for staff and Support Service Providers visiting or working on the sites. There will

be, however, some mandatory requirements regardless of location. Appropriate arrangements

will be made to ensure all personnel are suitably health and safety competent. These

arrangements will provide training and experience in safety behaviour, risk assessment,

safety procedures and methods, and use of work equipment.

Effective communication systems are critical to minimizing risks and taking a proactive lead

in the event of an emergency during the operation of the project. This will include

information on the site’s safety plan, feedback on performance and actions taken, learning

points to prevent injuries, etc. It is also crucial to display safety signs in strategic locations

within the project facilities.



1.2.6 Hazard Recognition

It is Tonguma Ltd’s policy that staff report hazards as they present themselves. If the hazard

can be rectified immediately without further risk, then the staff member should do so. Where

possible, the hazard must be recorded on the site in the hazard register and the appropriate

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actions completed. Where there is an ongoing risk, they shall be made safe and then reported

to the area supervisor for assessment and control.

Employees will undergo formal safety training and task training by experienced personnel

facilitated by Tonguma Ltd and Contractors will separately organise safety training for its

employees. This training will teach employees techniques in hazard identification and

recognition. The training will also identify potential hazards associated with the site and their

occupations. Following training, employees will be responsible for identifying potential

hazards as part of their normal job requirements. Rapid recognition of potentially hazardous

situations can avert an emergency. Monthly safety meetings will be held among elected staff

members to discuss a broad range of health and safety topics, but will periodically address the

following:

 Specific tasks to be performed;

 Time constraints;

 Hazards that may be encountered, including their effects, how to recognize symptoms,

and other danger signals; and

 Emergency procedures.

Each safety meeting will discuss a specific topic or issue. The meetings will serve as a

reminder of potential occupational hazards.



1.2.7 Emergency Response Training

The HSSE Officer will coordinate emergency response training. Training for all staff can take

the form of tool box talks, safety and environmental inductions or first aid training programs,

and will include training on transportation of hazardous materials, fire fighting, first aid, and

personnel rescue techniques. Specific job safety assessments, will give guide to formulate

response to any emergency on site. All staff will participate in annual training at the facility

to ensure that all members are trained in equipment use and emergency response methods.

Training will be directly related to their specific emergency response roles, and will include:













Communication methods and signals;

How to call for help;

Emergency equipment and its use;

Emergency evacuation while wearing protective equipment; and

Removing injured personnel from enclosed spaces.



Personnel will receive training in first aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and will

practise hands-on rescue techniques on at least an annual basis. Training will also include

recognizing and treating chemical and physical injuries and heat stress.



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1.2.8 Employee and Contractor Responsibility

Whether directly or indirectly employed by Tonguma Ltd, employees engaged in any form of

work associated with Tonguma Ltd, shall fulfil the requirements of this plan and all related

procedures as far as is reasonable practical.

All employees are obliged and empowered to identify, report and where appropriate, manage

potential hazards. Also, employees are responsible for ensuring they do not adversely affect

their own health or the health and safety of others through any act or omission. They are

obliged to:

 Report all incidents and hazards;

 Wear and maintain provided PPE;

 Operate & maintain machinery in a safe and practical manner;

 Follow all reasonable work instructions and procedures; and

 Comply with company policies & procedures



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2 WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN (WMP)

2.1 Introduction

The Waste Management Plan (WMP) is an essential component of the Environmental and

Social Impact Assessment for the exploration of kimberlite diamond within the Tonguma

Mining Ltd. concession area.

The WMP describes Tonguma Ltd’s commitment to taking all necessary steps to ensure that

the generation, collection, storage, transportation and disposal of all wastes generated during

all phases of project operations will be conducted in a safe, efficient and environmentally

responsible manner. The WMP detailed in this document considers:

i.

ii.



Proposed disposal methods; and

Equipment and staff.



2.2 Objectives of the Waste Management Plan

The objectives of the WMP are to:

i.

Generate the least possible amount of waste through reduction, reuse and

recycling practices, and review/approve all orders for materials, chemicals,

and supplies to limit the environmental impact;

ii.



Protect the health and safety of people;



iii.



Avoid or mitigate any potential negative impacts on all elements of the

environment – including, but not limited to, people, flora, fauna, air, surface

and groundwater resources, and the sea;



iv.



In compliance with Good International industry practices, process the waste

through treatment and disposal;



v.



Ensure due diligence is followed by all project personnel;



vi.



Track waste generation, handling and disposal to assess whether waste

management is being carried out as per the WMP and its associated directives;



vii.



Avoid costly clean-up through prevention; and



viii.



Ensure a logical and efficient plan for waste collection, sorting and disposal

that reduces the number of times the waste is handled and that produces

income for local people through sales of recycled waste.



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2.3 Waste Management and Disposal Facilities

2.3.1 Waste Identification

Waste streams likely to be generated during the exploration phase and in future, the mining

phase of the operations include the following:

i.



Hazardous and domestic wastes



ii.



Wastes from the mining process.



Management of each waste stream is discussed in subsequent sections of this plan.

2.3.2



Hazardous and Domestic Wastes



2.3.2.1 Domestic Wastes



A variety of domestic waste materials may be generated during operations and

particularly at the camp site. These materials include, but are not limited to the following:

i.



Aluminium, glass, plastic, paper, cardboard etc;



ii.



Electrical items e.g. cables, old appliances or equipment;



iii.



Kitchen wastes such as leftover food and food packaging;



iv.



Old tyres, hoses and rubber; and



v.



Sanitary waste/sewage.



The domestic waste facility will handle putrescible materials and non-degradable

wastes generated. Wastes going into the facility will be screened to reduce the amount of

materials deposited there. Any material that can be re-used or recycled will not be allowed

into the facility. The HSSE Officer will be responsible for the supervision of the

domestic waste facility.

Sanitary waste will be directed to underground septic tanks within the campsite.



Housekeeping:





All work areas shall be maintained in a tidy state, free of debris and rubbish;







The client’s waste management plan and collection and disposal arrangements shall

be used to align the project waste management program;







In cases where an inadequate standard of housekeeping has developed and

compromised safety and cleanliness, the HSSE Officer shall notify the relevant

supervisor to halt work until the area has been tidied up and made safe;







The HSSE officer, supervisors and site safety officers shall carry out regular

scheduled health and safety/ housekeeping inspections to ensure maintenance of

satisfactory standards; and



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All employees shall be trained in housekeeping requirements and hazard

identification.



Waste Handling

The following handling procedures, developed based on IFC’s guidelines for Waste

Management Facilities (2007), will be adopted as part of the Project’s waste

management program. Waste collection, handling, and transport guidelines include, but are

not necessarily limited to, the following:

i.



A routine schedule will be established for domestic waste collection and disposal;



ii.



Waste generators will be provided with appropriate waste disposal containers;



iii.



Enclosed refuse vehicles or vehicles equipped with tarps will be used for the domestic

waste collection;



iv.



Waste handling will be minimized during operations; and



v.



Waste containment will be maximized during operations.



Odours and the loss of wastes will be monitored, evaluated, and reduced at all waste

loading and unloading facilities. Fugitive refuse (for example, plastic bags and paper)

around the waste facility will be picked up, disposed of in the waste facility, and properly

covered.



Reuse, Recycling and Minimization of Waste Generation

The company will establish programs for material recycling and reuse to reduce the volume

of materials generated and deposited in the waste facilities. Local communities may be

interested in reusing plant debris such as scrap materials, wood and steel, used tires, used

vehicle parts, and other materials, which are no longer required or capable of repair to suit the

operation. These materials can be offered to local communities for reuse through public

consultation meetings and interviews to identify which materials can and cannot be

beneficially, as well as safely, used by the communities.

Making waste materials available to local communities is preferred over disposal if such

availability does not cause conflict. When materials are determined to be suitable for reuse or

salvage, a recycling program will be established to include the following:

i.



Identification of wastes to be recycled;



ii.



Provision of cleaning and treatment as needed to make wastes suitable for recycling;



iii.



Designation of a storage area for recyclable materials, segregated from other waste

materials, and located for easy access; and



iv.



Identification of local residents who have been authorized to collect, recycle and

salvage materials.



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Recycling programs will not be run for profit. Local residents who have been authorized to

collect materials from the site will be identified and their roles in the recycling program

coordinated through the Community Development Program.

Waste that can be reused around the facility will also be incorporated e,g. Old tires being

used as flower pots, old drums painted and used to line routes etc



2.3.2.2 Hazardous Wastes



Hazardous wastes are materials considered reactive, flammable, radioactive, corrosive and/or

toxic. The use of these materials should be limited to the extent possible. If use of these

materials is unavoidable, Management will adopt procedures for documentation and labelling

as well as the safe storage, handling, and disposal of these materials.

Hazardous wastes at the site include (but not limited to) the following:

i.



Waste oils and solvents;



ii.



Fuel and oil filters;



iii.



Batteries;



iv.



Aerosol cans;



v.



Petroleum-contaminated soils; and



vi.



Medical wastes.



Waste Oils, Fuels and Solvents

Waste oils and spent solvents will be generated by maintenance activities performed on

various machinery. Waste oils and solvents will be stored in collection tanks, and carted to

Koidu Ltd for use in the fabrication for emulsion used in blasting.



Fuel and Oil Filters

Waste fuel and oil filters from machinery and equipment will be generated throughout

the Project life. Handling of these materials will be by:

i.



Puncturing the filters and allowing them to drain for 8 hours; Collecting the

drained fuel or waste oil; and



ii.



Properly storing for later transfer to the Koidu Ltd facility for incineration.



Batteries

A variety of batteries, vehicle and non-vehicle, will be used throughout the life of the Project.

Used batteries will be accumulated and stored in an area that has a concrete floor with toe

berms and is sheltered from the weather. If recycling is unavailable, batteries will be

permanently disposed by incineration at the Koidu Ltd facility.

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Aerosol Cans

Aerosol cans containing paints, cleaning agents and other sprays will be routinely generated

by the Project. Aerosol cans should be properly depressurized before being disposed of to

prevent harm to area personnel.



Medical Wastes

Medical items which may be generated and would need to be disposed of include the

following:

i.



Needles and syringes;



ii.



Used cotton wool;



iii.



Used gauze and plasters;



iv.



Empty bottles and vials; and



v.



Test kits.



These wastes could be carefully bagged in labelled bins to be collected for disposal by

incineration at the Koidu Limited site.



Waste Handling

Hazardous wastes will be properly labelled for easy identification, and stored in a designated

area within the facility, protected from run-off or any external influences. It should be

ensured that the containers holding the wastes are not punctured and can be securely covered.

As the site does not currently have a hazardous waste treatment facility, wastes generated are

transferred to the Koidu Ltd facility where there is an incinerator. The HSSE Officer is

responsible for monitoring the storage area and coordinating regular transportation to Koidu

for disposal.



2.3.3 Mine Wastes

The exploration method of Tonguma Ltd requires the movement of large amounts of

overburden and creation of rock waste. Depending on the stripping ratio, large quantities of

overburden or waste rock often need to be removed to expose the mineral to be mined and

sampled. The overburden and waste rock is often disposed of in constructed waste rock

dumps. Management of these dumps is important to protect human health, safety and the

environment.

The issues that will be considered in the selection of waste storage and dump sites include:

i.



Storage capacity;



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ii.



Haul distance and disposal costs;



iii.



Need to minimize visual impact;



iv.



Site access and preparation;



v.



Environmental issues;



vi.



The existing drainage patterns;



vii.



The geology of the prospective ground; and



viii.



The proposed infrastructure positions.



These wastes are transported to the storage areas where they are crushed and spread out over

the surface of the area. Overburden materials will also be used, where possible, in carrying

out road maintenance within the mine site.



2.3.3.1 Waste Handling



The Mining Manager will be responsible for the disposal of exploration wastes. He will make

sure wastes generated from the Plant are disposed of in the proper manner and location. As a

minimum, the duties of the Sample Processing Manager will include the following:

i.



Provide the manpower and equipment needed to construct, inspect, and maintain mine

waste dump sites;



ii.



Give clear instructions to the employees on how mine wastes must be managed;



iii.



Give clear instructions on what is and is not acceptable for disposal into the waste

dump



2.4 Management Responsibilities

2.4.1 The Establishment of Environmental, Health and Safety Department

The HSSE Officer and his/her staff will be responsible for implementing the Waste

Management Plan contained in this report or that has otherwise developed as the explorations

progress. This department will also ensure regular monitoring and preparation of evaluation

reports most preferably by a contracted independent body and not necessarily by the Project

Proponent’s staff. This Department will be charged with the responsibility of putting in place

all Environmental and Social issues for the Project Proponent. The Environmental Safety

Officer will maintain records and report on any significant environmental matters,

including monitoring data, accidents, and occupational illnesses related to waste

management. The records and report will be reviewed by the managerial staff to

improve the effectiveness of the Waste Management Plan.

2.4.2 Waste Facility Record Keeping

The HSSE Officer will be responsible for maintaining records regarding active and

inactive cells for the domestic waste facility and the hazardous waste storage area.

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The HSSE Officer will be responsible to ensure daily compaction and covering activities of

the domestic waste facilities.



2.4.3 Management Training Responsibilities

Properly trained employees are necessary for the safe and effective operation of any

facility. Training programs will reflect the level and type of expertise necessary for a

given position. Safety precautions will also include protective clothing pertinent to the

work activity, area, and schedule. Clothing may include such items as hard hats, hard-toe

boots, gloves, safety glasses, reflective outerwear, and hearing protection. General safety

rules will be posted in strategic locations in the project area to describe general safety

requirements for waste disposal facilities and equipment.

New employee training programs and annual refresher courses on proper waste management

and disposal will required for employees under the direction of the HSSE Officer .



2.4.4 Employee Training Courses

Employees will be trained in the following safety topics before employment

commences and will also be reminded in annual refresher courses to limit the potential for

accidents. These courses will be developed and implemented by the Environmental Safety

Officer:

i.



Safe job practices and procedures;



ii.



Accident prevention;



iii.



Differences between wastes streams and an overview of incompatible wastes;



iv.



Safe lifting practices;



v.



How to read and understand Material Safety and Data Sheets (MSDS);



vi.



Safe material and waste handling practices; and



vii.



Proper control and maintenance of equipment and waste facilities.



2.4.5 Requirements of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for waste disposal

Waste management personnel collecting and disposing waste must wear appropriate PPEs.

The minimum required PPEs are:

i.



Neoprene chemical resistant gloves or better quality gloves;



ii.



Safety boots;



iii.



Coveralls;



iv.



Respirators



v.



Hard hats; and



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vi.



Safety glasses.



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3 EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN (ERP)

Emergency situations may arise from various activities and conditions during the course of

exploration and mining, which may include plant equipment or process failures, vehicle

accidents, power outages, etc. These could have potentially severe consequences for the

Project if no emergency response plans have been put in place.



3.1 Introduction

The Emergency Response Plan (ERP) is an essential component of the ESMP for the

Tonguma Ltd. The Emergency Management Method practiced on site for incident response,

emergency and crisis management, are designed to enable all relevant parties associated with

the Company to act quickly, decisively and cooperatively in any crisis or emergency

situation. This ensures an appropriately measured level of response and recovery actions,

depending on the nature, location and potential gravity of any given incident.

This document outlines the ERP for the project along with general Health and Safety

Program components. Emergency plans, organizational responsibilities, reporting procedures,

specific plans for responding to emergencies and emergency response training are also

covered in detail.

For the purpose of enabling consistent response and recovery actions and responsibilities

across all of Tonguma Ltd, all component plans of the framework recognize a consistent

three level company Incident Classification System. The level at which an incident is

declared, determines which response and recovery plans are implemented and which response

and recovery teams are mobilized.

Each team performs a different but complementary function to the others. The Incident

Management Teams are focused, dealing with controlling and containing the event and

ensuring appropriate health and safety and environmental outcomes. The higher level teams

are focused on operational support and consequence strategic management, dealing with the

strategic issues arising from the incident, including HR management and stakeholder (media)

communications.

The following measures will be put in place for the successful implementation of this plan:

i.



Personnel will be competent and understand their roles and responsibilities during an

emergency response situation;



ii.



Drills and exercises will be conducted on a quarterly basis to assess and improve upon

emergency response; and



iii.



The plan will be periodically updated to incorporate lessons learned from previous

incidents and exercises.



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3.2 Emergency Response and Preparedness

The integrated framework designed as emergency response and preparedness plan for this

project, reflect the needs and working relationships of the major parties to the Company and

the current operational structures in place to manage the company in the field and in support

offices. The integrated framework comprises three levels of response and recovery teams:









Incident Management Team(s) with supporting Emergency Response Team and

Camp Incident Teams;

Emergency Management Team; and

Crisis Management Team & and Stakeholders.



The integrated framework of response and recovery teams is represented as follows:



Source: Tonguma Ltd Draft HSE Plan



3.2.1 Incident Management Teams

Incident Management Teams (IMT) are unit/site-based team comprising of senior Tonguma

Ltd field staff responsible for managing incidents affecting Company staff, facilities and

operations. Each IMT is supported by field Emergency Response Teams (personnel and

equipment) for incidents such as medical emergencies, fire fighting, etc. Where applicable,

Incident Management Teams are to be supported by Camp Incidents Teams (CIT’s) are

mandatory at any accommodation centre involving Tonguma Limited personnel.

Tonguma Limited Emergency Services and Security Manager are responsible for ensuring

that a frame work template is available for each site to create their own site IMP.



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3.2.2 Emergency Response Team (ERT)

Emergency Response Team comprises site-based personnel who have received training and

are competent in emergency response procedures such as basic fire fighting, advanced first

aid. Team activation and composition is directly related to the emergency response

requirements. The team(s) carries out emergency response actions to control or resolve

emergency incidents at or near the incident location and assist external emergency response

agencies in the same manner. Only trained and competent individuals who are competent will

be allowed to actively participate in any training and response activity.



3.3 Emergency Response Plan

Tonguma Limited site shall maintain and document operational and tactical procedures for

site specific identified risks. The Emergency Response Procedures are to be managed by the

site Project Manager or equivalent and are to become an Annexure in the site Incident

Management Plan (IMP).

Typical emergency types, severity and responses that characterize the mining exploration

include:

Level I - Minor Incident

Level II- Moderate Incident

Level III- Major Incident



Incident



Severity



Slope failure of mine

Fuel/Oil Spillage

Fire/Explosion

Natural Disaster (Land Slide, Flooding)

Road Accidents

Machinery Accidents

Minor accidents (Scrapes, Cuts, abrasions

etc)

Medical Health Cases

Civil unrest and disturbance



Response to major emergency types includes:

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i.



Fire or Explosion - The fire fighting system to be setup on site



ii.



Pollution or Chemical Spills – Response to include oil and chemical spill

clean-up using spill kits and best practice spill containment measures.



iii.



Road Traffic Accidents – Work closely with the roads transport department

and install road signs.



iv.



Accidents – Response can be in the form of risk assessment, job safety

assessment and instituting safe work procedures



v.



Medical Health Cases – Have a clinic and paramedic, list of Hospitals and

Doctors to consult in cases of severe injuries.



vi.



Civil Unrest & Disturbances - The Human resources manager, the Sierra

Leone Sierra Leone Police and Labour Organization will be included in any

response protocol.



vii.



Natural Disaster – Response include involvement of National Disaster

Preparedness centres.



The employees will develop and maintain the ERP in compliance with applicable laws and

industry standards to ensure a timely and appropriate response to emergencies.



3.4 Organization and Management Responsibilities

Certain members of the management team will have direct responsibilities for

responding to on-site emergencies and will be part of the site emergency response team

(ERT). The ERT will be coordinated by the HSSE officer who will be assisted by an ERT

foreman.



3.4.1 Emergency Response Team

The HSSE Officer is responsible for recruiting and training the Emergency Response Team.

The ERT is comprised of site employees from all sections who are willing to submit to

special training in order to assist in the case of an emergency.

Training of the ERT will be ongoing so that members will be able to respond to on-site

emergencies. Refresher training will be conducted as necessary. Critical training areas

include the following:

i.



Respond to emergencies involving fires or explosions;



ii.



First aid training;



iii.



Lock-out-tag-out procedures;



iv.



Respond to emergencies involving injuries or fatalities;



v.



Train staff on site safety and emergency response procedures; and



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vi.



Control and mitigate spills or other accidental releases.



3.4.2 Camp Incident Teams (CIT)

Where required, these are the accommodation centre teams that are located at each of the

camps / accommodation villages and comprise the Camp Commander, (Tonguma Ltd

supervisor or experienced nominee), together with the Chief Warden, (camp manager) and

Area Wardens (camp staff).

The Camp Commander is responsible for the high level interface with the IMT Team Leader,

and the Chief Warden is responsible for the comprehensive management of the camp site

including the mustering and assembling of residents during times of emergency. Area

Wardens assist the Chief Warden in the communication with residents and the accounting of

residents and staff, should an evacuation be required.



3.4.3 Emergency Management Teams (EMT)

The Tonguma Ltd Emergency Management Team comprises of competent and trained senior

Tonguma Ltd management who are responsible for managing high level emergency and crisis

response and recovery for the Company, in accordance with the provisions of the Emergency

Management Plan. Depending on the nature and potential gravity of the incident, the EMT

may undertake this role alone (Level II Incident) or work with or hand over management of

components of the incident to the CMT (Level III Incident).



3.4.4 Crisis Management Teams (CMT)

The Crisis Management Team comprises senior Tonguma Ltd executives who are responsible

for managing crisis response and recovery for the Company, in accordance with the

provisions of the Crisis Management Plan (CMP). Depending on the nature and potential

gravity of the incident, the CMT may undertake this role alone as it may not involve a site

incident, i.e. corporate fraud.



3.4.5 Manager Responsibilities

On-site Managers will each be responsible for identifying potential safety issues

and for coordinating the response to emergencies in their work areas. They will be

responsible for notifying the appropriate personnel and authorities in the event of an

emergency. Managers will help monitor accidental spills and releases that may occur at

facilities under their supervision. Managers will also be responsible for documenting and

reporting all incidents including accidental spills or releases in areas under their direct

supervision.

The HSSE Officer in coordination with the Community Relations Officer will interact with

the public when necessary to:

i.



Provide information to the public on project hazards and response programs;



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ii.



Brief the public on emergencies; and



iii.



Arrange for evacuation and accommodation for affected people in the event of

extreme emergencies.



3.5 Fire Protection

The following systems have been put in place to prevent or handle a fire emergency:

 All buildings, worksites, equipment and infrastructure have installed fire detection

and/or suppression systems (inclusive of fire extinguishers) installed as determined by

risk assessments.





All systems and equipment will be serviced in accordance with the relevant Tonguma

Ltd standard. A routine inspection regime will be conducted by the site with a

documented process capable of being audited.







The site HSSE Manager is responsible for maintaining these records and making them

available to the Tonguma Ltd Project Manager & Security Manager for auditing

purposes as required.







All Tonguma Ltd personnel over a period of working will have gain experience in

using fire extinguishers. All fire wardens will have competency-based approved

training in usage of fire extinguishers.



3.5.1 Alarm Detection Systems and Operations

An approved means for prompt notification of fire emergency to workers and the public shall

be provided.

Those areas, including buildings, where a potential exists for a flammable liquid spill shall be

monitored as appropriate. The following methods below are proposed and will be used in this

project:

i.

Personnel observation or patrol;

ii.

Process-monitoring equipment that would indicate a spill or leak could have

occurred;6and8

iii. Provision of gas detectors to continuously monitor the area where facilities are

unattended.

3.5.1.1 Preparedness



The Emergency Response Team will act as first responders and will be trained in first aid,

fire rescue, evacuation, and working in closed and/or oxygen deficient space. The fire rescue

training will include annual training sessions comprised of the following:

i.

Activating the fire suppression system;

ii.

Performing drills to put out fires; and

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iii.



Responding to practice rescue scenarios.



3.5.1.2 Response Procedure



In the event of a major fire or explosion, the following procedures shall be followed:

i.

ii.

iii.

iv.

v.

vi.

vii.



Assess the location and severity of the situation;

Extinguish the fire if it can be accomplished without being exposed to

potential hazards;

Activate the emergency warning system;

Restrict access to the area;

Do not take health or safety risks by entering unstable or fire engulfed areas;

Notify the HSSE Officer and Emergency Response Teams according to

establish protocols; and

Assist in extinguishing the fire and securing the area only under the direction

of the Emergency Response Team.



3.5.1.3 Evacuation Procedure



Where applicable, each site is to have evacuation plans in accordance with the risk. These

evacuation plans are to be practiced, documented and annexed as part of the site Incident

Management Plan.

Accommodation sites are to have evacuation procedure documented and practiced.



Figure 3-1: Emergency Assembly Point within Tonguma Camp Site (Indicated by Sign)



Generally, the following Evacuation can be followed and tailored to suit every section of the

operations. In the event of an emergency requiring employee evacuation:

1. Notify the plant office by radio

2. The office will sound the alarm and notify all employees by radio to evacuate

3. All employees will come to the plant office by company vehicle obeying posted speed

limits

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4. Park in the parking lot and assemble in front of the office or inside if the weather is

bad and await instructions on exiting the facility if required.



3.6 Spills and Leakages

3.6.1 Response Procedure

In the event that a leak, spill, tank rupture, or other release occurs, the following procedures

would be followed:

i. Avoid danger to yourself and others (i.e., stop working, shut off power sources

and any moving machinery and equipment as before, alert others in the area of

danger);

ii.



Stay upwind of the emergency scene;



iii.



Identify the product that has been spilled, as well as immediate potential

hazards (such as possible contact of the spilled material with equipment or

other chemicals, or entry into a waterway);



iv.



If the identity of the substance cannot be determined, assistance should be

requested and the identity of the substance should be determined by qualified

personnel;



v.



If possible to do safely, prevent spill from entering waterways;



vi.



Assess spill quantity and characteristics;



vii.



Notify dispatch with as much information as possible; and



viii.



Arrange for a timely cleanup of spilled material by contacting the HSSE

officer.



Depending on the nature of the spilled material, the air quality in the area of the spill could be

unsuitable for breathing. Only trained personnel should enter areas that are not well

ventilated. Trained personnel should only enter these areas with appropriate breathing devices

and should always use the “buddy system” to provide assistance in the case of an emergency.



3.6.2 Reporting Procedures

Following an accidental spill event, the following information should be reported to the

HSSE Officer:

i.



Person or people involved;



ii.



Date, time, and location of discharge;



iii.



Description of the situation and site conditions;



iv.



Identification and estimated volume of discharged substance;



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v.



Actions used to control the extent and severity of the discharge;



vi.



Final disposition of discharged solutions;



vii.



Documentation of clean-up actions taken and final deposition of contaminated

material; and



viii.



Description of environmental effects from the discharge.



All records of spills will be documented according to Spill Reporting Procedures using the

Spill Report Forms. Completed forms will be submitted to the HSSE Manager, who will be

responsible to ensure that proper corrective actions have been taken, including remediation of

contaminated areas and the appropriate storage and disposal of the spilled material.



3.6.3 Spill Clean-Up Equipment

The following emergency spill equipment will be kept on site or other accessible area;

i.



Absorbents;



ii.



Skimmers;



iii.



Diesel engine driven drums;



iv.



Ropes;



v.



Personal Protective clothing;



vi.



Dispersant;



vii.



Scoop(Small Bowl);



viii.



Basic first aid kit;



ix.



Dry powder extinguisher;



x.



Pick axe; and



xi.



Shovels.



This equipment should only be used for emergencies and should not be used for any other

purposes. When these materials become depleted, they will be restocked as soon as possible.



3.7 Communications

Effective communication systems are critical to successful emergency response.



3.7.1 Internal Communications

The internal communication system is used to convey safety information to workers in

danger, and maintain site control. Radios are used when work teams are working away from

the main communication system. The internal system consists of alarms or short signals that

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can easily be conveyed by audible signals. Training on the internal communication system

will be provided to all employees as part of their employee orientation program.



3.7.2 Communications during an Emergency

During an emergency, the emergency response centre will be contacted immediately.

Information will be transmitted from the dispatch station and the security stations to the rest

of the project site. The main security stations will be equipped to handle all radio and

telecommunications calls in the case of an emergency.

In the case of an emergency a prompt notification of appropriate individuals will be done

immediately. In the event that there is a need for the timely and rapid notification of local

communities, the first responder will immediately contact the HSSE Manager who will

immediately contact the Site Manager and the key management team. This will trigger the

appropriate emergency notification system that will be developed. An announcement will

also be made over all radio channels stating which channel will be designated as the

channel for this emergency, and stating that non-emergency communications on this

channel will be discontinued. This reporting scheme will be code dated to keep control of

copies and to assure that up to date revisions are in place.



3.7.3 Communications with the Public

The HSSE Officer, in collaboration with the Community Relations Officer, will be

responsible for all site and local communications with the public. As required, meetings

will be held to disseminate information related to on-site emergencies. A Community Liaison

forum could be established as part of the PCDP process and this forum used for

communication regarding emergencies. The HSSE Manager will coordinate with the Site

Manager on the incident and advise on what information should be released to the public,

government officials and other interested parties. The Site Manager will be responsible to

inform the appropriate parties at the national level.

In providing information to the public, the HSSE Manager and Community Relations Officer

will provide information on the following:

i.



Description of the event;



ii.



Identification of the population that might be affected;



iii.



Description of any injuries and disposition of those involved in the accident;

Identification of any existing hazards;



iv.



Description of precautions taken to limit future risks;



v.



Identification of water source contaminated (if any);



vi.



Description of mitigation measures that are proposed or have been taken

to correct the problem; and



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vii.



Contact information.



Waiting and briefing areas for family/relatives of those involved in serious accidents will also

be established. Food and a sitting/sleeping area will also be provided to members of the

family and relatives as appropriate.



3.8 Grievances, Disputes and Security

The Project’s Public Consultation and Disclosure Plan include procedures for dissemination

of information to the public, stakeholders, and non-government organizations. The plan also

includes a mechanism for grievances, so that public concerns related to the project can be

addressed through a formal grievance process.

Despite this proactive approach, disputes could occur, for a number of reasons outside of the

project management’s control, and actions by workers or non-workers could develop and

may result in violent or non-violent protests, attacks on project personnel, property damage,

or even hostage taking. The Security Manager will oversee an on-site security team that will

be used to maintain the security of the site. This team will also work closely with local

government authorities (police, military) to maintain the security of the project area. In

addition, a response program to address these issues, in cooperation with the Sierra Leonean

government, will be developed for the site.

In the event of a confrontation with employees and/or non-employees, the HSSE department

will be immediately contacted. The security team will, under the direction of the HSSE

Manager, implement response protocols based on pre-determined plans. These plans and

protocols are not outlined here in order to maintain confidentiality and assure that such

response protocols can be undertaken without counter-plans having been developed that

would undermine the effectiveness of the response.



3.9 Emergency Response Training

The HSSE department will coordinate emergency response training. The Emergency

Response Team will participate in annual training at the site to ensure that all members are

trained in equipment use and emergency response methods. The Emergency Response Team

members will be trained in transportation of hazardous materials, fire fighting, and spill

control and mitigation, first aid, and personnel rescue techniques.

On site emergency personnel, who have roles in addition to their ordinary duties, will have a

thorough understanding of emergency response procedures. Training will be directly related

to their specific emergency response roles, and will include:

i.



Emergency chain-of-command;



ii.



Communication methods and signals;



iii.



How to call for help;



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iv.



Emergency equipment and its use;



v.



Emergency evacuation while wearing protective equipment;



vi.



Removing injured personnel from enclosed spaces; and



vii.



Offsite support and how to use it.



Emergency personnel will receive training in first aid and CPR and will practise hands-on

rescue techniques on at least an annual basis. Training will also include recognizing and

treating chemical and physical injuries and heat stress.



3.9.1 Employee and Contractor Training

The Emergency Response Team, under the responsible charge of the HSSE Manager and

Officer, will provide safety and emergency response training to all staff. The training will

identify site-specific hazards and hazards associated with the project in general. The training

will also review standard operating procedures, use of protective equipment, signalling an

emergency (the alarm to be used, how to summon help, what information to give and who to

give it to), evacuation routes and refuges, reporting protocol when an alarm sounds, and other

general safety procedures. Emergency response training will also be provided to train staff on

emergency response procedures, chains of command, and responsibilities of key individuals.

Safety, emergency response, and first aid training will be provided at the time of hire. All

staff will also be required to attend annual refresher courses. Contractors that perform any

work on site will be required to show evidence of appropriate health, safety and emergency

response training. The project management will develop an orientation program to advise

contractors and site visitors on basic health, safety and emergency procedures such as

emergency signals and evacuation routes.



3.9.2 Emergency Drills

Periodic testing of emergency procedures will be performed to ensure that the company and

external emergency services can appropriately respond to emergency situations.

Testing of emergency procedures will involve external emergency services providers, where

appropriate, to develop an effective working relationship. This can improve communication

and cooperation during an emergency.

Emergency drills can be used to evaluate the company’s emergency procedures, equipment

and training, as well as increase overall awareness of emergency response protocols. Internal

parties (e.g. workers) and external parties (e.g. fire department personnel) will be included in

the drills to increase awareness and understanding of emergency response procedures.

Tonguma Ltd will maintain records of emergency drills. The type of information that will be

recorded includes a description of the situation and scope of the drill, a timeline of events and

actions and observations of any significant achievements or problems. This information will

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be reviewed with the drill planners and participants to share feedback and recommendations

for improvement.



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SECTION D



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4 RESETTLEMENT POLICY FRAMEWORK (RPF)

4.1 Introduction

It is not envisaged that the project will entail large scale displacement of people and extensive

damage to crops. However, it is possible that the infrastructure requirements of the project in

terms of feeder road construction and other project logistical requirements may require that

certain structures be removed and also result in damage to crops. Whilst it is impossible at

this stage to determine and assess these, procedures should nevertheless be put in place to

handle such matters if they arise. A full Resettlement Action Plan (RAP) will not be prepared

at this stage but a Resettlement Policy Framework (RPF) is developed in this section. The

RPF identifies objectives, principles, policies, procedures, organisational arrangements and

estimated costs (where possible) for dealing with resettlement and compensation payments

related to the implementation of the Project. The objectives of the RPF are to:





Set out policies, principles and institutional arrangements;







Articulate a compensation payment and resettlement policy for the Project;







Describe arrangements for resolving potential conflicts involving displaced persons;







Describe arrangements for implementing and monitoring the compensation payment

and resettlement process.



The Project will avoid resettlement where possible, but where inevitable and unavoidable, the

resettlement policy is to assure that every affected individual and household is moved in an

expeditious manner and that after relocation every individual and household is at least as well

off, if not better off than prior to resettlement. A framework for asset compensation and

entitlements based on the national policy is usually developed. Compensation rates for

several classes of assets, including land and crops, are established by legislation as part of

national policy. Compensation rates should be agreed with the participation of the

government and other stakeholders. Projects usually seek to ensure that compensation is

adequate (at least equivalent to replacement cost as required in World Bank OP 4.12 on

involuntary resettlement) and will provide alternative entitlements and payments where

government agreed rates do not meet this requirement.

The Project is expected to cause resettlement of some communities due to the extent of the

lease area; the resettlement policy is to ensure that every affected individual and household is

moved in an expeditious manner and that after relocation every individual and household is at

least as well off, if not better off than prior to resettlement.

Presently, the resettlement situation is largely based on the impact on settlements due to

blasting activities. There is no surveyed area demarcated exclusively to resettle households

but Tonguma Ltd is ready to fully support any particular household affected by the project to

relocate to safe non operational areas.

Until the exploration activity is certain to become a mining establishment, a Resettlement

Action Plan will not be developed and this Resettlement Policy Framework will be enforced.

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The framework for asset compensation and entitlements based on the national policy is

usually developed. Compensation rates for several classes of assets, including land and crops,

are established by legislation as part of national policy. Compensation rates should be agreed

with the participation of the government and other stakeholders. Projects usually seek to

ensure that compensation is adequate (at least equivalent to replacement cost as required in

World Bank OP 4.12 on involuntary resettlement) and will provide alternative entitlements

and payments where government agreed rates do not meet this requirement.



4.2 Legislation and Regulatory Framework

4.2.1 National Legislation

4.2.1.1 Constitution of Sierra Leone



The Constitution includes some provisions to protect the right of individuals to private

property, but Section 21 of the Constitution also sets principles under which citizens may be

deprived of their property in the public interest. Consequently, the Constitution upholds the

fundamental rights of citizens to own property and receive support from the State when that

property is compulsorily acquired by the State. Furthermore, it also makes provision for the

prompt payment of adequate compensation and access to the court or other impartial and

independent authority for the determination of the land owner’s interest or right, and the

amount of any compensation to which he is entitled and for the purpose of obtaining prompt

payment of that compensation.

4.2.1.2 Draft National Lands Policy, 2013



The National Lands Policy addresses many of the lapses of the dual land tenure system in

Sierra Leone (freehold in the Western Area and communal in the provinces). It also provides

for the compulsory acquisition of land in the public interest. The principles of the land policy

include among others:





Principle of land as a common national or communal property resource held in trust

for the people and which must be used in the long term interest of the people of Sierra

Leone. This principle only holds where it does not violate existing rights of private

ownership;







Compensation to be paid for lands acquired through compulsory acquisition will be

fair and adequate and will be determined, among other things, through negotiations

that take into consideration government investment in the area;







No interest in or right to any land belonging to an individual or family can be

disposed of without consultation with the owner or occupier of the land; and







No interest in or right to any land belonging to an individual or family can be

compulsorily acquired without payment, in reasonable time, of fair and adequate

compensation.



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4.2.1.3 Cultural Heritage Issues



The National Environmental Policy (1994) provides for the collection of relevant data on

biological diversity and cultural heritage. It seeks to promote socio-economic and cultural

development through the preservation of biological diversity for the sustainable utilisation of

natural resources. There are references to the preservation and/or respectful removal (taking

into consideration cultural sensitivities) of “society bushes” for mining and other purposes in

various regulations.



4.2.2 World Bank Stipulations

4.2.2.1 Procedures for Involuntary Resettlement according to World Bank OP 4.12



World Bank’s Operational Policy (OP) 4.12 (World Bank, 2004) is seen internationally as the

global standard for involuntary resettlement guidelines. The fundamental objective of

resettlement planning, as stipulated in OP 4.12, is to avoid resettlement wherever feasible, or,

where resettlement is unavoidable, to minimise its extent and to explore all viable

alternatives.

Where land acquisition and involuntary resettlement are unavoidable, resettlement and

compensation activities are carried out in a manner that provides sufficient opportunity for

the Project Affected Persons (PAPs) to participate in the planning and implementation of the

operation. Furthermore, if incomes are adversely affected, adequate investment is required to

give the persons displaced by the Project the opportunity to at least restore their income.

The OP 4.12 further requires particular attention to be given to the needs of vulnerable groups

especially those below the poverty line, including:

i.



Landless individuals and households;



ii.



Elderly persons;



iii.



Women and children;



iv.



Indigenous groups and ethnic minorities; and



v.



Other disadvantaged persons.



4.3 Implementation

Framework



Arrangements



for



Resettlement



Policy



4.3.1 Implementing Agency

Tonguma Ltd is the implementing agency and will ensure that the implementation of the RPF

is in compliance with the existing legislation related to the expropriation of land for public

purposes, payment of compensation and resettlement of affected persons. Tonguma Ltd will

provide all the necessary financial resources for the implementation of the resettlement and

compensation payment process and provide all managerial and technical expertise required

for the implementation of the RPF in an effective and proper manner. During the preparation

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and implementation of the resettlement and compensation payment process, the Tonguma Ltd

will cooperate with various government agencies and other stakeholders at various levels,

which are briefly described below.

4.3.1.1 National Level



Various Government Agencies will act as primary support agents to Tonguma Ltd during the

preparation and execution of the entire resettlement and compensation payment process.

These are indicated in the table below:

Table 4.3-1: Government Support Agents and Responsibilities



4.3.1.2 Regional Level



The agencies involved in implementing the resettlement and compensation payment

programme at regional level include the Regional Housing Officer and Regional Agriculture

Officer, who will mainly be involved in the asset inventory during the preparation of the

RAP.

4.3.1.3 Local Level



Village Resettlement Committees

A Village Resettlement Committee (VRC) should be formed for each larger affected village

or a few small villages together. The VRC will consist of representatives of all Project

Affected Persons (PAPs), including representatives of vulnerable groups. The main tasks of

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the VRC is to address issues dealing with all aspects concerning compensation payment,

identification of relocation sites, contribution to development of infrastructure at relocation

site, resolution of grievances from PAPs, monitoring of the implementation of RAP, and

assessment of the effects of relocation on PAPs.

Other Local Agencies

In addition to the VRC, it is envisaged that the following agencies will be involved in the

resettlement and compensation payment process at the local level:

i.



Chiefdom Authority Representative(s) with the following key responsibilities:

a. Confirmation of land ownership;

b. Confirmation of features of cultural/archaeological significance (e.g. shrines);

and

c. Resolution of ownership disputes



ii.



Chiefdom Native Administration with the main task to assist the village leaders.



4.4 Eligibility Criteria

4.4.1 Affected Parties

Affected groups under the Project and in line with the definitions outlined in the national

legislation and OP 4.12 can be categorised into the following groups:

Affected Individual: An individual refers to one who suffers loss of assets or investments,

land and property and/or access to natural and/or economic resources as a result of the Project

activities, and to whom compensation is due.

Affected Household: A household is affected if one or more of its members is affected by

Project activities, either by loss of property, land, loss of access, or otherwise affected in any

way by Project activities.

Affected Local Community: A community is affected if Project activities affect their socioeconomic and/or social-cultural relationships or cohesion.



4.4.2 Eligibility for Compensation

4.4.2.1 Eligible Individuals and Households



Fixing eligibility criteria for entitlement purpose is essential for the resettlement process and

compensation payments. According to the World Bank OP 4.12 procedures, the following

project affected persons will be eligible for compensation:

a. Those who have formal rights to land, including customary and statutory rights of

occupancy reorganised under the national laws;



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b. Those who do not have formal legal rights to land at the time the census begins but

have a claim to such land or assets provided that such claims are recognised under

national laws, or become recognised through a process identifies in the RAP; and

c. Those who have no claim to land they are occupying or using.

Those covered under ‘a’ and ‘b’ above are to be provided compensation for land they lose, and

other assistance in accordance with the policy. Persons covered under ‘c’ are to be provided with

resettlement assistance in lieu of compensation for the land they occupy or use as well as other

assistance, as necessary, to achieve the objectives set out in this policy, if they occupy or use the

Project area prior to a cut-off date established by the responsible agency. Persons who encroach

on the area after the cut-off date are not entitled to compensation or any other form of

resettlement assistance. All persons included in ‘a’, ‘b’ or ‘c’ above are to be provided with

compensation for loss of assets other than land.

Upon identification of the need for involuntary resettlement in the Project area, Tonguma Ltd will

carry out a census to identify the persons to be affected by the Project, to determine who will be

eligible for assistance, and to discourage inflow of people ineligible for assistance. The company

will also develop a procedure for establishing the criteria by which affected persons will be

deemed eligible for compensation and other resettlement assistance. The procedure will include

provisions for meaningful consultations with affected persons and communities, local authorities

and NGOs as well as the grievance mechanisms.



4.4.2.2 Eligible Communities



Communities permanently losing land and/or access to assets and or resources under statutory or

customary rights will be eligible for compensation. Example of community compensation could

be for market place, schools and health posts. The rationale for this is to ensure that the preProject socio-economic status of affected communities is also restored.



4.4.3 Eligibility According to National Law

In determining eligibility, the national legislation may differ from the World Bank Policy. If

the World Bank OP 4.12 allows a broader range of eligibility than the national policy, this

will provide the framework for resettlement for the Project.



4.5 Evaluation of Affected Assets

4.5.1 Types of Compensation Payments

Individual and household compensation will be made in kind and/or in cash. For cash

payments, compensation will be calculated in the national currency and adjusted for inflation.

For compensation in kind, items such as land, houses, other buildings, building materials,

seedlings, agricultural inputs and financial credits for equipment may be included. Assistance

may include moving allowance, transportation and labour.



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Making cash payments raises issues regarding inflation and security that have to be

considered. Cash payments must allow for inflationary adjustments of compensation values.

For payment of compensation in-kind, the time and new location will have to be decided and

agreed upon by each recipient.

In kind compensation will be strongly recommended to an affected person if his or her loss

amounts to more that 20% of the total loss of subsistence assets. The preference for in-kind

compensation is because it offsets inflationary pressures on the costs of goods and services and

hence provides better livelihood security for affected persons.



4.5.2 Compensation Calculations for Assets

Compensation for all land use and assets must be made, including for:

i.



Cultivated land and crops;



ii.



Residential buildings, structures and fixtures;



iii.



Sacred sites;



iv.



Vegetable gardens and beehives;



v.



Horticultural, floricultural and fruit trees;



vi.



Other domestic trees; and



vii.



Loss of business and employment.



4.5.3 Rules for Compensation

Households, individuals and communities deemed to be entitled to compensation will be

identified. The nature of the entitlement will vary between each individual and households.

For the most part the operational entity and unit of entitlement is envisaged as being the

household as a whole. In some instances this may have to be re-examined and negotiated with

individuals within the household. These criteria need to be defined early in the resettlement

process and should be agreed to by all stakeholders.

Affected households, individuals and communities are entitled to compensation based on

agreed values. Different compensation options have to be discussed with all affected parties

via the consultative meetings in order to obtain agreement on the adequacy and acceptability

of the compensation package. Compensation valuations should focus on the following:

i.



Compensation options in terms of replacement of homesteads, structures and

replacement land for physical resettlement where this is necessary;



ii.



Options for the relocation of graves and sites of cultural, historical or religious

importance; and



iii.



Relocation and replacement of any community structure (e.g. schools).



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4.5.3.1 Compensation for Cultivated Land and Crops



A farmer whose land is acquired for Project purposes will be compensated not only for the

land but also for his labour and crop loss. In this context, "land" is defined as an area in

cultivation, or being prepared for cultivation, or cultivated during the previous agricultural

season. Compensation relating to land will cover the market price of labour invested in it as

well as the market price of the crops lost.



4.5.3.2 Compensation for Economic Trees



Compensation for fruit trees and other economically valuable trees will be compensated for

in the same way as for crops and in accordance with the national law.



4.5.3.3 Compensation for Residential Buildings, Structures and Fixtures



Compensation will be paid by replacing structures such as huts, houses, farm outbuildings,

latrines and fences. Any homes lost will be rebuilt on acquired replacement land, however

cash compensation would be available as a preferred option for structures (i.e. extra

buildings) lost that are not the main house or house in which someone is living. The going

market prices for construction materials will be determined. Alternatively, compensation will

be paid in-kind for the replacement cost without depreciation of the structure. The Project

will survey these prices for administrative purposes on an ongoing basis.

Compensation will be made for structures that are:

i. Abandoned because of relocation or resettlement of an individual or household; and

ii. Directly damaged by exploration/mining activities.

Replacement values will be based on:

i. Drawings of individuals’ households and all its related structures and support services;

ii. Average replacement costs of different types of household buildings and structures based

on collection of information on the numbers and types of materials used to construct

different types of structures (e.g. poles, bricks, rafters, bundle of straw, corrugated iron

sheets, doors etc.;

iii. Prices of these items in different local markets;

iv.

Costs of transportation and delivery of these items to acquired/replacement land or

building site; and

v. Estimates of construction of new buildings including labour required.

4.5.3.4 Compensation for Sacred Sites



Compensation for sacred sites is determined through negotiation with the appropriate parties.

Sacred sites include but are not restricted to altars, initiation centres, ritual sites, tombs, and

cemeteries. They include other such sites, places or features that are accepted by practice,

tradition and culture as sacred.



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4.5.3.5 Compensation for Vegetable Gardens



Vegetables and green leaves are essential ingredients for food in most Sierra Leonean homes.

The family displaced/affected as a result of the land acquisition will have to purchase these

items in the market until a replacement garden starts to bear. The compensation will,

therefore, be calculated based on the average amount that an average household spends on

buying these items for one year per adult from the local market.



4.5.3.6 Compensation for Loss of Business or Employment



Compensation for businesses (i.e. flour mills, kiosks, coffee houses and local eating and

drinking places) will be estimated based on the daily or monthly income of the affected

parties.



4.6 Methods of Valuation

Compensation will be determined by taking all assets into account, including land, crops,

trees, buildings and structures, sacred sites, vegetable gardens and beehives, horticultural,

floricultural and fruit trees, and other domestic cash crops and fruit trees.

The valuation of assets will be carried out by certified private or public institutions or

individual consultants on the basis of valuation formulae adopted at the national level and/or

by the Project. This will be based according to the unit costs as provided in the national

regulations, and until then, on unit costs of the asset at market rates.



4.7 Selection of Potential Resettlement Sites

Resettlement requires the physical relocation of people to a new location. If resettlement of

affected households and communities is required, Tonguma Ltd has to confirm and select one

or more potential sites for the relocation of affected households and communities. The

process of identifying and selecting potential resettlement sites should be transparent and

accountable. During the entire process of selecting potential resettlement sites, the affected

households and communities as well as the host communities must be informed and

consulted continuously, so that their concerns and preferences are properly taken into account

during the decision-making process.

During site selection process, the following issues should be considered:



i.



Location;



ii.



Access to natural resources, in particular arable land;



iii.



Maintaining community structure;



iv.



Continued access to existing economic activities;



v.



Impacts in host communities; and



vi.



Land ownership and tenure rights.



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4.8 Implementation and Monitoring Procedures

4.8.1 Notification of Expropriation Order

Tonguma Ltd will issue a written notification to the VRC for all lands it wishes to

expropriate. They will also with support of the local administration organise meetings at

village level, during which all affected households will be verbally notified.



4.8.2 Preparation of Individual Compensation Dossiers

Tonguma Ltd with the support of the local administration will need to prepare a compensation

dossier for each individual affected household, which shall contain all necessary personal

information of the affected household as well as detailed information with regard to the total

landholding and the inventory of all assets that will be lost due to the land expropriation and

resettlement. All information in the compensation dossier will be confirmed and witnessed by the

local administration and the VRC. Each affected household will receive a copy of the completed

compensation dossier.



4.8.3 Preparation, Approval and Signing of Compensation Contract

Using the completed compensation dossiers, the Tonguma Ltd will prepare a compensation

contract for each affected household, in which all property and land to be expropriated are

listed as well as the selected options and types of compensation (cash and/or in-kind). The

cash amount of compensation to be paid to the affected household is also specified in the

compensation contract, including any displacement compensation to be paid. Taking into

account the low literacy rates in the affected villages, the compensation contract should be

read aloud in the presence of the affected party. In the presence of Tonguma Management,

local administration and VRC, the compensation contract should be signed by all concerned

parties.



4.9 Payment of Compensations

Following the signing of the compensation contract, Tonguma Ltd will pay, or cause the

payment, of compensation to holders of the expropriated land. Communities must also be

paid compensation for the expropriation of communal land if it is required for the

implementation of the Project and/or the resettlement of displaced households. The land and

any related assets can only be taken by the company after the compensation is fully paid to

the affected households and communities.

In addition to payment for the acquisition of communal land, a community will also be

compensated in kind for the loss of any communal infrastructure (i.e. school buildings, health

post, boreholes or wells for potable water, market structures, roads, warehouses, etc.) in the

form of the reconstruction of the lost facilities to at least the same standard or better standard

to serve the same function.

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4.10 Preparation of Resettlement Sites

Prior to the relocation of affected households, Tonguma Ltd will select the resettlement

site(s) through consultation with all displaced people and host communities. Subsequently,

the company will undertake the preparation of the resettlement sites, including the clearing of

plots of land for the construction of houses, construction of (additional) social/public

infrastructures (i.e. school/classrooms, health post, access road).

As soon as the preparation of the resettlement sites is completed, the displaced households

must be given the opportunity to visit the resettlement sites before they are relocated, so that

they can check if all facilities are in place.



4.11 Resettlement of Affected Households

Tonguma Ltd shall only proceed with the relocation of the displaced households after the

compensation has been paid fully, the preparation of the resettlement sites is completed and

the displaced households had the opportunity to visit the resettlement sites.

Immediately after the arrival of the displaced households on the resettlement sites, the company

will undertake the necessary measures needed to restore and develop their livelihoods and

standards of living through the provision of development assistance, such as:



i.



improved seeds, chemical fertilisers and agro-chemicals in the first year following the

relocation;



ii.



agricultural extension and veterinary services, including improved breeding stock;



iii.



tree seedlings; and



iv.



skill training, technical advice and/or credit facilities required for development (off-farm)

job opportunities.



4.12 Monitoring

The monitoring of the Project activities related to land expropriation, compensation payment

and resettlement must fit in the overall monitoring framework and programme for the entire

Project.

The main objective of the monitoring plan is to provide all concerned stakeholders with

timely and updated information and data with regards to the execution of any RAP that may

be necessary.

Internal monitoring, also called performance and/or progress monitoring, is an internal

management function allowing Tonguma management and other stakeholders to measure

physical progress against milestones set out in the RAP in order to:

i.



Ensure that due process has been followed with adequate public meetings being held;



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ii.



Verify that there are no outstanding or unresolved land acquisition issues regarding

the Project, that the census, socio-economic surveys and asset inventories of all

project affected persons have been carried out, and that property valuation and

resettlement have been undertaken in accordance with the provisions of the RPF;



iii.



Maintain records of any grievances that require resolution;



iv.



Oversee that all resettlement measures are implemented as approved by Tonguma

management and relevant local authorities;



v.



Verify that funds for implementing resettlement activities are provided in a timely

manner are sufficient for their purposes, and are spent in accordance with the

provisions of the RPF.



vi.



Document timely completion of all resettlement obligations (e.g. payment of the

agreed-upon sums, construction of new structures, etc) for all permanent and

temporary losses, as well as unanticipated, additional construction damage, while

updating the database with respect to any such changes; and



vii.



Ensure that monitoring and evaluation reports are submitted.



4.13 Grievance and Redress Mechanisms

Providing credible and accessible means for affected persons to pursue grievances allows

Tonguma Ltd to address genuine issues in a timely manner and decreases the chances of

resistance to their activities from disgruntled persons.

At the time that the individual RAPs are approved and individual compensation contracts are

signed, affected individuals and households would have been informed of the process for

expressing dissatisfaction and seeking redress. The grievance procedure will be simple and

will be administered as far as possible, at local levels to facilitate access by project affected

persons.

All grievances concerning non-fulfilment of contracts, levels of compensation, or seizure of

assets without compensation shall be addressed to the VRC. All attempts shall be made to

settle grievances amicably. Those seeking redress and wishing to state grievances will do so

by notifying their VRC, who will inform and consult with the local and regional

administration to determine validity of claims. If a claim is valid, the VRC will notify the

complainant accordingly. If the complainant’s claim is rejected, the matter shall be brought

before the local and/or regional authority for settlement. The complainant may seek redress in

the established national legal system.

It has to be noted that in the local communities, people take time to decide to complain when

aggrieved. Therefore, the grievance procedures will ensure that the project affected persons

are adequately informed of the procedure, before their assets are taken. The grievance redress

mechanisms is designed with the objective of solving disputes at the earliest possible time,

which will be in the interest of all parties concerned and therefore, it implicitly discourages

referring such matters to a court for resolution.

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All objections to land acquisition shall be made in writing, in the language that the project

affected persons understand and are familiar with, to the VRC. Copies of the complaint shall

be submitted to the concerned Resettlement Officer (RO) within 60 days after the issue of the

Notification of Expropriation Order. Channelling complaints through the VRC is aimed at

addressing the problem of distance and cost the project affected persons may have to face.

The VRC shall maintain records of grievances and complaints, including minutes of

discussions, recommendations and resolutions made.

The procedure for handling grievances will be as follows:

i.



The affected person must file his/her grievance in writing to the VRC with a copy

submitted to the concerned RO. The grievance note should be signed and dated by the

aggrieved person, where the affected person is unable to write, he/she should obtain

assistance to write the note and endorse the letter with his/her thumbprint;



ii.



The VRC must respond within 14 days during which any meetings and discussions to

be held with the aggrieved persons must be conducted. If the grievance relates to

valuation of assets, experts may need to be requested to revalue the assets, and this

may necessitate a longer period of time. In this case, the aggrieved person will be

notified by the VRC that his/her complaint is being considered;



iii.



If the aggrieved person does not receive a response or is not satisfied with the

outcome within the agree time, he/she must lodge his grievance to the district

administration and the concerned RO; and



iv.



The district administration and concerned RO will then attempt to resolve the problem

(through dialogue and negotiation) within 14 days of the complaint being lodged. If

no agreement is reached at this stage, then the complaint is taken to court.



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5 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ACTION PLAN (CDAP)

5.1 Introduction

This Community Development Action Plan (CDAP) has been developed to manage the

activities associated with the exploration activities of Tonguma Ltd, which may lead to the

occurrence of the issues and impacts discussed. The plan consists of a management strategy,

broken up into recommendations that attempt to maximise benefits and minimise adverse

impacts on the local communities.



5.2 Purpose and Objectives

The following management measures will be implemented to ensure that the issues and

concerns expressed about the project are properly mitigated and avoided where possible:

i.



The project will be planned and carried out strictly in accordance with the

provisions of the Environment Protection Act 2008 as amended in 2010;



ii.



Tonguma will ensure that direct benefits from the exploration are focused on the

affected and any host communities; and



iii.



This CDAP will focus on establishing sustainable livelihood projects and capacity

building within the affected communities as detailed in SIA study.



The management measures in this report will attempt to mitigate any negative impacts that

may result from the project and enhance any positive consequences that may occur.

The key objectives of the CDAP are:

i.



To provide opportunities for long-term community and economic development

programmes for the affected communities;



ii.



To identify appropriate mitigation measures to address socio-economic issues and

impacts identified in the ESIA;



iii.



To identify appropriate mitigation measures to address induced population growth

resulting from a possible influx of newcomers into the area, attracted by the

project development;



iv.



To seek ways of building mutually beneficial linkages between the affected

people and other developments;



v.



To develop initiatives in the seven affected communities.



5.3 Need for Community Development Action Plan (CDAP)

Carrying out an Environmental and Social Impact Assessment for a large scale project such

as the Tonguma exploration project involves the formulation of a Community Development

Action Plan (CDAP). This CDAP document of the Tonguma Exploration Project has been

47

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developed after consultations and discussions with the project affected communities

(Kpandebu, Sandeyima, Mavehun, Palima, Tongola Tokpumbu I, Tokpombu II) and other

stakeholders to address broader community requirements.



5.4 Socio-Economic Survey

5.4.1 Approach and Methodology

Residents in the area under study voluntarily offered their services to assist CEMMATS’

field staff to carry out the ESIA and baseline survey in the project affected community.

During this exercise, discussions were held and interviews conducted with the project

affected people in the seven communities.



5.4.2 Findings from Social Assessment Survey

The activities associated with the Exploration Project in the study area will have positive and

negative impacts on the lives of the communities and their environment. These impacts have

been assessed through a Social Impact Assessment (SIA) Study. The SIA Study aids in

drawing analyses of how the proposed operations will impact the socio-economic profile of

the residents and the community as a whole. The potential positive impacts of the operation

of the project include:

 Job opportunities for local residents;

 Enhanced infrastructural development;

 Boom in business activities;

 Improvement in community development activities;

 Improved health and education facilities; and

 Enhanced water and sanitation facilities.



Some of the potential negative impacts of the operations include:

 Loss of farm land;

 Population Influx;

 Loss of access to rich alluvial deposits within the Tonguma Lease area

resulting in miners having to travel far distances to mine less productive deposits

outside the lease area;

 Dug out exploration pits provide breeding grounds for mosquitoes which are a

serious threat to the health of residents of affected communities;

 Destruction of houses from blasting exercises;

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 Destruction of crops; and

 Possibility for Resettlement.



5.4.3 Social Amenities

Social and economic amenities such as markets, community centers, court barries1,

entertainment centers are situated within and around some of the communities in the study

area. Mosques can be found in all the communities and a few churches in others.

The focus group discussion meetings for this survey were held at the Kpandebu Community

Hall, (for Kpandebu, Palima, Tokpombu I and Tongola) and at the Tokpombu II Court barrie

(for Tokpombu II Mavehun and Sandeyeima communities).



5.4.4 Housing and Household Effects

The majority of the respondents can be categorized as low income earners while a few are

middle income earners. The majority of the household in the community own simple and

basic household assets such as beds, chairs, tables, radios, tape recorders, motor cycles, and

generators



5.4.5 Type of Dwelling Unit

The type of house in which households dwell is worth analysing as, just like other social

indicators we have examined, this is also a measure of socio-economic status. The most

common type of dwelling house is mud house plastered with cement and corrugated iron (CI)

sheet roofing. Structures with more expensive material such as cement/concrete blocks and

CI sheets account for less than 20% of households. Thus if the standard of houses in the study

communities were used as proxy measure, one could safely conclude that most households

fall in the middle socio-economic status.



5.4.6 Credit Facility

The Tongo Community Bank is the only financial institution operating within the study area.

Only very few people confirmed ever having received loans from this bank. Participants in

the focus group discussion meeting confirmed that the high interest rate charged by the bank

is a principal reason more loans are not sought from the bank.



1



Local court house where meetings are held by local authorities and where disputes are settled



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5.5 Some Planned Initiatives by Tonguma Ltd

In order to address the above negative impacts, Tonguma Ltd has developed a Community

Development Action Plan (CDAP) which will implement initiatives aimed at improving the

living conditions of the project affected communities. The plan consists of a management

strategy, broken down into recommendations that attempt to maximize benefits and minimize

adverse impacts on local communities.

Some of the intended initiatives are:

 Support to Education;

 Support to Agriculture;

 Support to Technical Vocation Skills Development; and

 Support to Health and sanitation.



5.6 Views from Project Affected Persons (PAPs)

From discussions with affected households, local and traditional authorities, and various

stakeholders (youth, women and NGOs) in June, 2014, the following development projects

have been identified by residents of affected communities for consideration:

 Provision of additional sources of safe drinking water;

 Provision of good toilet facilities;

 Support to agricultural development;

 Provision of educational materials – teaching and learning materials;

 Provision of scholarships for deserving school going children; and

 Provision of Technical Vocation Skills Development.



5.7 Implementation Plan

5.7.1 Organizational Responsibility and Function

The overall implementation of the CDAP will be funded by Tonguma Ltd. The project will

be managed by a Community Development Management Committee (CDMC) which will be

responsible for disbursement and management of funds during implementation of the

proposed projects.



5.7.1.1 Proposed Membership of the CDMC



The proposed membership for this committee will comprise but not limited to the following:



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 The Member of Parliament for the project area;

 The Paramount Chief of Lower Bambara Chiefdom;

 Members of the Chiefdom Development Committee;

 Town chiefs of the seven affected communities;

 Leaders of the youth groups;

 Women’s leaders;

 Representative of the tribal groups;

 The Councilors of Wards 41, 42 and 43; and

 Tonguma Community Relations Officer (CRO);

The final composition of the committee will be determined jointly by Tonguma Limited and

the Chiefdom authorities.



5.7.1.2 Responsibilities



The Committee will be responsible for finalizing guidelines included in this CDAP document

and coordinating the implementation of the CDAP (including disbursement and management

of funds). Meetings will be held at least every second month in order to discuss relevant

community development related matters and monitor the progress of the CDAP relative to

targets.



5.7.1.3 Budget



The total budget (Table 5.7-1) for the implementation of the recommended projects in this

CDAP is estimated at $800,000 eight hundred thousand Dollars) - $160,000 (one hundred

and sixty thousand Dollars) per annum over a 5 year period. This budget covers the indicated

developmental projects for the concerned community.

The implementation of the first year development projects is expected to commence in 2014.



Table 5.7-1: Estimated First 5 Years of the CDAP



BUDGET 000 (US$)

PROJECT



RESOURCES Yr 1 - Yr 2

2014

2015



Support to Funds

and 35,000

Education

learning

materials



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35,000



51



- Yr 3 – Yr 4

2016

2017

35,000



35,000



- Yr 5

2018

35,000



- Total

175,000



Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



BUDGET 000 (US$)

PROJECT



RESOURCES Yr 1 - Yr 2

2014

2015



- Yr 3 – Yr 4

2016

2017



- Yr 5

2018



- Total



Support to Funds

and 20,000

Agriculture

materials



20,000



20,000



20,000



20,000



100,000



Provision of Materials and 35,000

Solar

Service

Electricity



35,000



35,000



35,000



35,000



175,000



Support

Health



35,000



35,000



35,000



35,000



35,000



175,000



Support for Funds

provision of

and materials

safe drinking

water

facilities



35,000



35,000



35,000



35,000



35,000



175,000



Total



160,000



160,000



160,000



160,0000



160,000



800,000



to Funds

and materials



5.8 Monitoring and Evaluation

There is need to appoint an independent agency to undertake the monitoring and evaluation

of the implementation of the CDAP. Monitoring will be undertaken annually till the end of

the Project. The monitoring programme will address both the short term and long term

impacts of the project on the affected community. Monitoring activities will include:

 Ensuring the satisfactory implementation of the CDAP; and

 Environmental degradation is limited so that the economic and resource base

upon which the community depends is not destroyed.



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6 PUBLIC CONSULTATION AND DISCLOSURE PLAN

(PCDP)

A PCDP is designed to provide local residents, non-government organizations (NGOs),

government and other interested parties with project information and to allow those

stakeholders to participate in the planning process. Stakeholder participation encourages

sustainable growth by accounting for community needs as they relate to the proposed project.

Development of sustainable programs will help to maintain long-term project viability. A

PCDP incorporates public meetings for stakeholders to air project concerns and to ensure that

during different phases of the project benefit stakeholders by allowing them to voice their

opinions, make suggestions, meaningfully influence the process of project development, and

keep them (stakeholders) informed of current updates on project information.



6.1 Objectives of PCDP

The objectives of a PCDP are:





To disseminate relevant project information to stakeholders/affected communities and

to document any concerns/issues from such stakeholders;







To improve communication between project management and affected communities;







To document public consultation events; and







To disclose selected project documents to affected communities/stakeholders.



The main objective of the PCDP is to establish a program for multi-directional

communication between Tonguma Limited and stakeholders. To meet this objective, this plan

provides the following:

 Outline of IFC requirements for public consultation and disclosure;

 Identification of key stakeholders in the Tonguma Project;

 Description of the resources and the responsibilities of PCDP implementation,

including receipt and response to grievances; and

 Descriptions of how data will be collected and maintained, in order to adequately

monitor and report the effectiveness of the PCDP.



6.2 Resources and Responsibilities

The Community Relations Officer reports directly to the Project Manager and will be

responsible for the public consultation and disclosure program. He/She will also be



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responsible for coordinating with Tonguma’s Community Relations Officer on all community

relations, public consultation programs and dispute resolutions.

Other responsibilities and duties of the HSSE Officer may include the following:





Identifying when meetings are necessary and scheduling them;







Circulating or publicizing agendas and local advertising;







Inviting specific individuals to meetings;







Attending and documenting meetings;







Directing any required follow up; and







Working with NGOs, the Community Development Management Committee to

develop, plan and implement sustainable development projects as shown in the

CDAP.



Follow-up work on the above may include additional meetings, arranging for specialized

consultants, or bringing specific issues to the Project Manager and ensuring that appropriate

actions are taken.



6.2.1 Stakeholders

Public consultation and disclosure initiatives need to target all stakeholders listed in the

CDAP to keep them informed of project plans and of any substantial changes that may be

made to its design or operations.



6.2.2 Consultation and Disclosure Program

The consultation and disclosure program is aimed at informing the stakeholders of project

plans and activities in a manner that promotes open dialogue among all interested parties, but

particularly those that are or will be affected by the Project. The program allows directly

affected parties to have meaningful input in the decision-making process regarding the

development of the Project and the mitigation of impacts that will affect them. Meetings will

be scheduled and informational materials disseminated as needed to keep people informed

and to maintain project transparency in the public eye. It is the responsibility of the HSSE

Officer, along with the Community Relations Officer, to ensure that the program objectives

are accomplished.



6.2.3 Notification for Meetings

Stakeholders will be informed about the Tonguma Project updates through some or all of the

following methods:

 mass media (newspapers, posters, radio, television);

 direct communication in local languages;

 direct mail;

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 open-houses (field offices, Project site);

 illustrated pamphlets;

 public meetings; and

 informing appropriate community leaders.

A two-week notice, followed by a three-day reminder notice will be provided for such

meetings.

Minutes of consultation meetings will be made available to the meeting participants and other

identified interested parties within two weeks from the meeting date. Minutes will be written

in an understandable manner and can be obtained from the Project office or other location

agreed.



6.2.4 Grievance Mechanisms

Despite the best public consultation and community relations efforts, inevitably there will be

circumstances that arise where the company and stakeholders disagree. The following

mechanisms will ensure that grievances can be properly filed, and that fair and appropriate

consideration will be given to those issues.





The HSSE Manager, with the Community Relations Officer and the Community

Development Management Committee will be responsible to build relationships with

the surrounding population and communities and to collect and disseminate

information.







Public and individual meetings will be held on a regular basis to provide a forum for

open communications.







Relationships will be built with government offices (local, regional, and national

levels), affected Community Authorities and the Community Development

Management Committee and their participation in consultation meetings will be

encouraged to facilitate communications.







Formal meetings with individual stakeholders and Tonguma personnel will be held as

needed to assure follow up and confidentiality on identified issues and concerns.







A formal process or plan for receiving and responding to grievances will be

developed and implemented by the Community Development Management

Committee and approved by the Community Relations Officer and HSSE Manager.

This plan will address the following requirements:

 All grievances will be documented into a central registry or filing system at

Tonguma Ltd office.

 Receipt of all grievances will be acknowledged, by letter or other means, as

soon as possible, and no later than 7 days after receipt.

 The grievance will be reviewed by the Community Development Management

Committee and appropriate action taken or implemented.



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 Multiple grievances by the same person, or different persons which address

the same or similar issue, will be considered together and will warrant

additional attention.

 The Community Development Management Committee will provide a report

through the Community Relations Officer to the HSSE Manager on a bimonthly basis summarizing grievances received, actions taken, and any

outstanding issues to be addressed.

 Relevant (non-confidential) information will be disclosed to the public.

 If necessary, the relevant Government authorities will be notified to share

information and address Sierra Leone policy or regulation issues.

6.2.5 Reporting

The Project Manager, through his/her HSSE Officer and Community Relations Officer, has

the primary responsibility for all public consultation and disclosure monitoring and reporting.

The Community Relations Officer will report on the monitoring of Community Development

Projects as listed in the CDAP. This will be reported periodically as part of the regular health,

safety and environmental monitoring programs.

Additional reports may be developed and provided to the local communities and identified

stakeholders on a case-by-case basis. This will primarily be through the feedback at regularly

scheduled meetings. Copies of these reports will also be provided to the relevant government

agencies of Sierra Leone such as the EPA-SL.

Information sheets and posters may be appropriate for reporting on some items and issues.

Radio broadcasting and/or direct communication may be used for Project updating in the

affected communities which have a low literacy rate.



6.3 Public Consultation During ESIA Study

Some amount of Public Consultation has already started during the execution of the Social

Impact Assessment aspect of the ESIA. CEMMATS undertook a socio-economic survey of

the project area in 2008, in the form of questionnaires administered to households in the

concession area. Field investigations were also carried out in June 2014 which included the

conduct of focus group discussions with various categories of people within the project area

including, artisanal miners, farmers and members of the general public.

To commence the Focus Group Discussions and meetings, the Social Assessment team leader

disclosed the project to the participants by informing them of the activities and plans of

Tonguma Ltd, and explaining the role of CEMMATS in carrying out the Environmental and

Social Impact Assessment Study.

During these meetings, participants were asked about their perceptions of Tonguma Limited

exploration activities; their responses were quite mixed. While the majority felt positive

about the project, a sizeable proportion of the participants felt some apprehension about the

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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



project activities. Those who expressed optimism about the project gave reasons such as

creation of jobs and enhancement of community development in areas of education, health

and sanitation, agriculture, community infrastructure such as roads, markets, schools, etc.

Those who had negative perceptions regarding the project activities gave reasons such as

resettlement of community members, loss of farm lands, environmental degradation and

influx of people into communities with its attendant problems of increased crime rate,

overcrowding, encroachment on limited socio-economic facilities, and increase in Sexually

Transmitted Infections (STIs).

The minutes of all meetings and discussion held as part of the PCDP process during the ESIA

study can be found in the Appendices of Volume 1 of this report (The Main ESIA Report)



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SECTION G



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7 CLOSURE PLAN

7.1 Decommissioning

Once it is determined that no further mining operations are feasible, buildings, equipment and

materials would be removed, sold for scrap or demolished and buried on site after removal of

all industrial wastes. No industrial wastes would be left on site. Any contaminated soil on site

at decommissioning would either be remediated on site or containerized and shipped off site

as hazardous waste. Concrete foundations would be broken to below ground level, the

footings buried and the waste material landfilled on site. From preliminary exploration

results, it is likely that mining will continue but however, all is dependent on the final

exploration results.



7.2 Reclamation and Closure Plan

7.2.1 Approach

This plan details actions to be taken to ensure the site is chemically and physically stable in

the event that the exploration phase ends in closure of operations. It aims to ensure that the

land is returned, to the extent feasible, to an appropriate end land use as determined through

the ESIA.

Progressive reclamation is being implemented, where possible, where facilities or disturbed

areas are no longer active in order to minimize the project footprint. Figure 7-1 shows

ongoing progressive reclamation efforts by the company, through the revegetation of a

former waste dump site.



Figure 7-1: Progressive Reclamation Efforts (Revegetation of Closed Waste Dump Site)



For final closure and reclamation, where feasible, slopes created during mining would be

graded to blend into the natural surroundings as much as possible, compacted surfaces would

be scarified, top dressing of overburden would be applied where erosion of top dressing is not

problematic and the prepared surfaces planted with native species. Excavated pits with ponds

60

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would be breached or removed and re-vegetated. These would be reclaimed to a dry cover

and vegetated.

During operations, reclamation trials will be carried out in areas targeted for progressive

reclamation to determine which treatments and vegetation successfully return areas to a

productive state. Experience gained during the project operating life will be applied on final

closure. Post closure monitoring will be carried out for a number of years in conjunction with

other post closure environmental monitoring to ensure the land is returned to productivity, as

determined by the end land use, without further intervention.



7.3 Objectives

The objective of the reclamation and closure program is to convert the concession area to an

income generating end use closest to its natural use. Following cessation of operations,

disturbed areas will be stabilized and reclaimed to a number of alternative land and marine

uses that will provide income opportunities for local communities.

An inventory of all the areas of the facility will be carried out to identify which will need to

be addressed for closure. The following areas are expected to be included:





Mine pits;







Mine ponds;







Process facilities;







Waste management facilities;







Exploration, access and haul roads;







Topsoil stockpiles.



7.4 Closure and Reclamation Methods

General closure and reclamation activities relevant to the operation are discussed in this

section as follows:

 Facility Salvage, Demolition and Disposal;

 Surface Grading;

 Sediment and Erosion Control;

 Soil Stockpiling and Redistribution;

 Seed and Plant Propagation; and

 Re-vegetation Monitoring.



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7.4.1 Facility Salvage, Demolition and Disposal

After the operation has been completed, buildings, equipment and infrastructure will be

managed for closure. Stakeholder input will be used to determine the final disposition of

facilities. Following salvage, demolition and disposal activities, the area will be graded to

create a natural final topographic relief. The only material to be included in re-grading the

facilities will be inert material such as concrete, stone, and brick used for foundations.

Compacted surfaces will be ripped to relieve compaction and reduce surface run-off and

sediment transport.

During facility closure, confirmation sampling and testing of the soils will be completed as

needed to verify that areas have not been impacted by hydrocarbons or other potentially

hazardous substances. In the case where hazardous substances are identified, the

contaminated areas will be remediated in accordance with the Emergency Response Plan.



7.4.2 Surface Grading

All excavated and mined-out areas will be graded as near as possible to original contours, and

as necessary to obtain free drainage conditions. Material used for backfill will be determined

by evaluation of spoil piles and water quality monitoring results.

All buildings and other structures and equipment used in mining and processing will be

removed. Concrete footings and pads will be removed and used as backfill, and topsoil areas

will be graded and re-vegetated.

Haulage and access roads will be graded and closed except for agreed upon access roads. To

match adjacent slopes, roads and berm, materials will be pulled from the fill portion to aid in

grading. Exploration roads at the mine site will be regarded in a similar manner to haul and

access roads. This will include all areas outside the active mining area.



7.4.3 Sediment and Erosion Control

All pits will be graded to obtain free draining conditions to avoid soil erosion. Reclamation

materials will be classified and their present and future potential impacts to water quality

evaluated and prioritized for use in reclamation as backfill. The reclamation plans will also

optimize usage of the available materials to maximize the effectiveness of the reclamation

plan.

The closure plans will make extensive use of impervious soils and will ensure that all slopes

in reclaimed areas are flatter than 6:1 slopes to reduce and potentially eliminate soil erosion.



7.4.4 Soil Stockpiling and Redistribution

The primary reclamation materials to be used are cover soil, subsoil, gravels and selected

waste overburden. Impervious ground covers will be installed using clays excavated from the



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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



mine pits.



7.4.5 Seed and Plant Propagation

The closure plan will re-establish grassland and/or forest settings on the areas previously

disturbed by mining. The permanent seed mixtures will include native species appropriate for

the area. Vegetation will consist of tree and shrub types, and a grass seed mix that is native to

the area. Introduced vegetation species will be considered to add for their benefits to add

organic matter to soils (Acacia and Cashew).



7.5 Monitoring

Closure and post-closure monitoring will document the progress of the closure effort. The

elements of the closure and post-closure monitoring programs will include the following:

 Confirm the long-term stability of reclaimed surfaces, high walls, and

embankments;

 Evaluate the success of re-vegetated areas using ground cover, species diversity,

and productivity (in reclaimed areas) as measurement tools; and

 Evaluate the success of natural re-establishment and migration of marine

biodiversity to demonstrate that water quality objectives are met.



7.6 Implementation Schedule and Costs

7.6.1 Closure and Reclamation Schedule

Once operations are completed in an area, final closure activities will begin. Upon

completion of final closure, areas will also be monitored for a two-year period to evaluate

program performance.



7.6.2 Financial provision

A life of project closure assumes effective rehabilitation or remediation of relevant impacts

on the environment and the surrounding community. The assessment of closure costs

involves the quantification of infrastructure components and applying rates to rehabilitate

each component.

The mitigation costs for environmental management will depend on many factors including

the following:

-



The type of ore mined;



-



The type of technology employed;



-



The scale and extent of operations;



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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



-



The life of the mine operations (years spent mining)



The company is theoretically budgeting a sum of $5 million for closure and reclamation of

the exploration phase, based on the closure costs for similar operations. However it is certain

that the project will be progressing to the mining phase; if for any reason the project

operations are shut down, a full estimate of the closure costs will be made closer to that time.



7.6.3 Stakeholder Consultation

The consultation process will involve discussions on closure options and will provide local

communities with an opportunity to become involved in the various stages of the planning.

Local communities will be consulted to determine the use of post-operation structures

constructed for the benefit of the communities.



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SECTION H



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8 MANAGEMENT, MITIGATION, MONITORING AND

IMPLEMENTATION MEASURES

8.1 MANAGEMENT PLANS

The management plans will be further refined and detailed for each phase of the project

closer to the time the phase is initiated. Plans for monitoring are also proposed and key

personnel with responsibilities identified. An attempt has also been made to cost the

monitoring programme.

The overall accountability for the implementation of this plan lies with the Company

management though various parties will remain responsible for certain activities. The

management will remain accountable for ensuring that the mitigation measures, monitoring

and corrective actions are implemented. The tables below do not indicate responsible parties

but rather who is responsible for a particular aspect.

The following Tables outline the plans for the stages in the project life.



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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



OPERATIONAL STAGE

Table 8.1-1: Management Plans for the Operational Stage



Issue



Objective



Mitigation measure



Performance target



Responsible

party/Partie

s



Cost



HSSE

Manager



N/A



US$



NOISE MANAGEMENT

Noise

management



Minimize noise

impact







Limit blasting operations to daylight hours







Use millisecond delays between rows of blast

holes to reduce the amount of explosive

charge detonated at any given instant.







Reduce the powder factor, that is, use less

explosive per unit volume of overburden







Maintain good public relations with the

surrounding communities and put in a good

advance warning system before blasts.







Vehicles to be switched off when not in use











© CEMMATS Group Ltd, September

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For every blast



Vehicles and

machinery to be

Regular maintenance of vehicles to ensure serviced according

silencing equipment are effective i.e. exhaust

to their respective

mufflers

handbooks;

Noise producing sources such as generators

and crushers and other machinery to be either



67



N/A



Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



Issue



Objective



Mitigation measure



Performance target



Responsible

party/Partie

s



Cost



Programme to be

drawn up and

followed



HSSE

Manager



$15,000



Reduce emissions

from unpaved roads

and exposed

materials.



HSSE

Manager/Eng

ineering

Manager



$15,000



Good vehicle and

machine



Engineering



N/A



US$



housed in enclosures or barriers put up around

the noise source. The barriers should be

installed between the noise source and

sensitive noise receptor, as close to the noise

source as possible. Regular maintenance to

ensure noise levels are normal.

Noise monitoring programme



AIR QUALITY

Air Quality



To reduce the

negative impacts

of dust emitted

from

material

transport, crushing

and dust fumes.







Introduce road spaying program based on

rainfall, evaporation rate, and traffic

frequency to reduce dust being emitted from

road transport.







Material will be transported in closed vehicles

to reduce dust emission. Material crushing

will be scheduled to reduce frequency.







Initiate dust fallout monitoring program to

monitor efficiency of dust management

measures.



To reduce the Regular maintenance of vehicles and machines.

negative impacts

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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



Issue



Objective



Mitigation measure



Performance target



of vehicle and

machine exhaust

fumes.



maintenance records



Responsible

party/Partie

s

Manager



Cost

US$



SURFACE WATER AND GROUNDWATER

Surface water



Geohydrology



Impact

of

pollution on water

resources

and

Impact of excess

water discharged

to environment







Pit infilling and

drawdown of

Water Table















Implement a detailed Plant Stormwater

Management Plan. This plan details the

construction of stormwater canals within the

plant area.



The separation of

clean and dirty water

and prevention of

excess water

discharge to impact

Understand the impacts of discharge from the on the environment

various areas and identify what water can be

used in what process and what waters can be

discharged from the mine.



$20,000



Preventing impact

on water levels of

Evaluation of impacts on water supply wells boreholes and

for the camp, office, and resettlement areas.

drawdown of

underground water

levels



$10,000



Monitoring of borehole levels



SOILS

To minimise the

loss of topsoil

and the risk of

spillage of fuel

© CEMMATS Group Ltd, September

2014







Minimize areas stripped and maintain soil

structure, stripping soil materials and

stockpiling appropriately.



69



Only clear essential

areas and maintain

soil structure and

fertility for use in



N/A



Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



Issue



Objective



and oil on site.



Mitigation measure







Performance target



Limit the movement of vehicles on site as

much as is practical;



Responsible

party/Partie

s



Cost



Restriction or

limitation of

development in

sensitive areas.



HSSE

Manager/Ext

ernal

Consultant



17000



An ecological audit



HSSE

Manager/Ext

ernal

Consultant



$8,000



US$



rehabilitation and

finally mine closure.



FLORA AND FAUNA

To minimize

clearance, loss and

disturbance to the

natural

environment, in

particular plants







Avoid sensitive areas such as ridges and

wetlands.







Avoid access in areas not earmarked for

operation.







Carry out an ecological audit to minimise loss

of fauna species.



To minimize

disturbance to the

natural

environment and

to maintain

sensitive areas and

other habitat

possibilities







Avoid areas not earmarked for exploration.







Removal should only occur in demarcated

areas and where possible the natural

environment should be rehabilitated to ensure

ecological functioning.







Carry out an ecological audit

TOPOGRAPHY



Topography



To maintain the

integrity of the



© CEMMATS Group Ltd, September

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All activities should be restricted to defined

work areas



70



No excessive

erosion, and



Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



Issue



Objective



landscape and to

minimise

disturbance to the

natural

topography



Mitigation measure



Performance target







Capture erosion from stockpiled materials







Place waste rock in a location where it will

not disturb drainage lines



Responsible

party/Partie

s



Cost



HSSE

Manager/Env

ironmental

consultant



Costed in

RAP and

CDP

programm

es



US$



drainage lines

avoided



SOCIO-ECONOMIC/CULTURAL

Social &

cultural

impacts



To optimise

employment

creation by the

project



© CEMMATS Group Ltd, September

2014







Encourage and invest in alternative

livelihoods development such that the local

area is not reliant to any significant degree on

the project for employment and economic

opportunities







Optimise recruitment of people from affected

communities, the surrounding settlements and

nationally.







Develop a project specific protocol for the

fair treatment and employment of citizens.







Optimise labour intensive methods to increase

local employment opportunities.







Carry out a skills audit in surrounding

villages and maintain a detailed register for

use by the Project and its contractors.







Create and maintain a register of casual

employees from the surrounding villages for



71



Successful

implementation of

the RAP and CDP



Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



Issue



Objective



Mitigation measure



Performance target



Responsible

party/Partie

s



Cost

US$



use when casual labour is required by project

contractors.





Work in partnership with existing government

and related organisations already wellestablished to promote local economic

development



DECOMMISSIONING STAGE

Table 8.1-2: Management Plans for the Decommissioning Stage



Issue



Objective



Mitigation measure



Performance target



Responsible Cost

party/parties US$



NOISE MANAGEMENT

Noise and

Vibration



Minimise noise

impact













© CEMMATS Group Ltd, September

2014



Vehicles to be

serviced according

Regular maintenance of vehicles to insure to vehicle services

silencing equipment is still effective i.e. exhaust

handbook.

mufflers; and

Vehicles to be switched off when not in use;



Fixed noise producing sources such as generators,

pump stations and crushers to be to be either

housed in enclosures or barriers put up around the

noise source.



72



HSSE

Manager



N/A



Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



Issue



Objective



Mitigation measure



Performance target



Responsible Cost

party/parties US$



AGRICULTURE/LIVELIHOODS

Agriculture, soil

and land use (on

the exposed

land)



Exposure of a 

large area of land

for farming and

other land use

practices

in

concession area.

Quality of the

loose sediments

may not provide

for an arable land

area.



Maintenance of alternative livelihood strategy for Success of LIAR

the newly unemployed; provision of improved programme

seed varieties



HSSE

Manager/Env

ironmental

Consultant



N/A



HSSE

Manager/Env

ironmental

Consultant



Costed in

decommis

sioning

plan



FLORA AND FAUNA

Forest and

Terrestrial flora



The use of

exposed land for

farming would

however lengthen

fallow periods

and reduce

pressure on forest

or flora species of

conservation

importance



© CEMMATS Group Ltd, September

2014



Post operation Forest conservation programs; Success of

community awareness; Detailed survey and decommissioning

monitoring of tree species as part of an on-going programme

ecological survey



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Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



Issue



Objective



Mitigation measure



Performance target



Responsible Cost

party/parties US$



Success of

decommissioning

programme



HSSE

Manager/Env

ironmental

Consultant



SOCIO-ECONOMIC

Socio-economic

life



To decrease

dependence of

national economy

on mining



© CEMMATS Group Ltd, September

2014



Strive to ensure that sustainable economic

development in the broader project area takes place

with a focus on diversifying the local economy.



74



Costed in

decommis

sioning

plan



Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



8.2 MONITORING PLANS

Environmental monitoring is an essential tool in relation to environmental management as it

provides the basis for rational management decisions regarding impact control. The

monitoring program for the project will be undertaken to meet the following objectives:

 To check on whether mitigation and benefit enhancement measures have actually

been adopted, and are proving effective in practice;

 To provide a means whereby any impacts which were subject to uncertainty at the

time of preparation of the EIA, or which were unforeseen, can be identified, and to

provide a basis for formulating appropriate additional impact control measures; and

 To provide information on the actual nature and extent of key impacts and the

effectiveness of mitigation and benefit enhancement measures which, through a

feedback mechanism, can improve the planning and execution of future, similar

projects.

The following monitoring plans are proposed:

8.2.1 Climate

Climate monitoring should be carried out on site in order to detect changes in weather

patterns throughout the operation.



8.2.2 Fauna and flora Monitoring Plan

The monitoring of the flora environment is conducted by investigating the constituent

components. A monitoring program needs to evaluate the management actions of each of

these components.



8.2.3 Noise Monitoring Plan

Noise monitoring should be undertaken by a qualified person and depending on the intervals

of the monitoring programme, reports be compiled and submitted to management to ascertain

compliance with the required standards. Management should be advised of any significant

increase in the ambient sound level as operations continue.



8.2.4 Groundwater Monitoring Plan

A groundwater monitoring plan is proposed throughout the operation and closure phases of

the project. Monitoring is carried out to assess whether changes are occurring to the ambient

(baseline) water quality of local surface water and aquifers, either as a result of operations, or

contamination from surrounding activities, and to make recommendations for mitigation or

remediation of any significant sources of contamination, if identified.



Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



8.2.5 Air Quality Monitoring Plan

Based on the predicted impacts on the surrounding environment it is recommended that

ambient PM10 monitoring be done and a dust fallout monitoring network established on a

continuous basis.



8.2.6 Surface Water Monitoring Plan

The surface water management plan including monitoring should be implemented to prevent

(and through mitigation reduce) negative impacts on the surface water resources. The plan

should be reviewed regularly as the operation progresses in order to address any deviations

arising from the project description.



8.3 Environmental Management, Monitoring and Training Costs

Costs related to environmental benefit enhancement and mitigation measures, etc. include

costs for environmental management, monitoring, training and capacity building. Costs of

certain items associated with environmental management and monitoring will be an integral

part of specific items incorporated in overall project budgets, and no separate budget is

necessary to cover these aspects.

The HSSE Officer will manage a Department, appropriately structured to address

environmental health and safety issues. A Community Relations Officer will be used in the

job scope. The operating cost of this Department would have been included in the normal

budget. There will however be need for periodic independent environmental audits. All the

costs associated with implementing the ESMP are included in the overall budget of the

project for operations. Other costs for Environmental management have already been alluded

to in the section on Environmental management Plans.



Table 8.3-1: Costs for monitoring and Training



Work/cost area



Initial cost

$



Annual recurrent

costs



Comments



$

Independent

Environmental audit

during operational

stage



10,000



Once a year



Environmental

monitoring

equipment



30,000



5,000



Specialist equipment

necessary for

monitoring should be

provided.



Environmental and



10,000



8,000



Comprehensive



Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



safety training



TOTAL



training necessary

initially with manuals

prepared. Annual

training updates

should be effected

40,000



23,000



Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



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FESS (2007). Reclaiming Land After Mining: Improving Environmental Management and

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Interim Report: Preliminary Hydrogeologic Investigation as input to Pre-Feasibility Study

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KARL RAMJOHN (2008). Some Terminology & Definitions: Sustainability, Land Use &

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Larbi,

A.

(2012).

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Profile



Le Billon, P, and Levin, E. (2009), “Building Peace with Conflict Diamonds? Merging

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e=10&ind ex=5.

SSL (Statistics Sierra Leone), 2009. Sierra Leone Demographic and Health Survey, 2008.

Ministry of Health and Sanitation, Freetown, Sierra Leone.

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Rainforest National Park and Recommendations on the Way forward. Estelle Levin Limited

and WWF



Tonguma Exploration Project ESIA Volume 2 – Environmental and Social Management Plans (ESMP)



CEMMATS Group Ltd



Beyoh House

7 Cantonment Road

Off King Harman Road

Brookfields

Freetown

Sierra Leone

www.cemmatssl.com

A